Amine Allergy Remedy

It’s been about two years now since I started building this Low Amine Recipes blog. It has helped a great number of you, and been an inspiration for me in the kitchen, and a driving force behind my exploratory cooking. You may have noticed, however, that in the last several months, I haven’t posted very much. Part of it is because I am unemployed and can’t afford to waste any food on failed attempts, rare though total straight-to-garbage-bin flops may be. Finances have been rough. I’m still loving life, but it’s certainly more lean around these parts.

The other reason I haven’t been posting as much is because I have been able to eat more amines lately. I have been getting away with nectarines, cherries, cauliflower, kale, unprocessed apple cider vinegar, and all other kinds of high amine goodies. I can even have the infrequent tomato, if it’s organic, non-gmo, and fresh, which is stunning, as it was previously my Kryptonite.

Processed foods, food dyes (especially Yellow #5 (Tartazine)), preservatives, canned, aged, and otherwise old foods still do me much harm. However, high amine fresh produce is becoming more and more tolerable. I have even been able to throw in small amounts of raw walnuts and almonds to up my magnesium intake.

My symptoms have reduced… BY ALMOST THREE QUARTERS.

So… How did I do it?

Though I didn’t take my own following advice, please consult your doctor first. Know you are taking your health into your own hands. I am not liable for your actions or your results. My actions may not be what your body chemistry needs. But then again, it may be. I do not feel right keeping what I know about my own success from you.

I don’t know why my symptoms have so drastically reduced. I only know the changes I’ve made that caused it. This is what I will be sharing with you today.

“BODY RESET”
Firstly, I was on a strict low amine diet for over a year. I remember reading somewhere that if you’re on a super strict low amine diet, sometimes the body “resets.” I don’t think my body did this. I did occasionally break down and have the giant plate of evil (often a big bowl of pasta), knowing that by the time I was done eating it, I wouldn’t be able to stand up to put my own dish away. No walking for three days was my penance. But I still did it now and again.

ORGANIC, NON-GMO, WHOLE FOODS
Though I was originally a skeptic, I switched to non-GMO, organic foods as much as possible, and noticed a significant change with that. I realize there aren’t studies to prove GMO is damaging, or that organic is better, or… whatever. But what I do know is that my body reacts better to organic, non-GMO foods. I do not experience as many amine allergies or other bodily breakdowns. Additionally, I removed 99% of processed foods. The only processed things that remain are tamari (yes, I can get away with that now), rice/quinoa pasta, and gluten-free bread.

GLUTEN
I do my best to keep gluten minimized in my diet. When I eat more of it, I notice my allergies are worse. When I did my elimination diet, I was diagnosed as “gluten intolerant,” however, I didn’t think much of it until I realized that by eating it, it made my other allergies worse. Just a heads up…

APPLE CIDER VINEGAR
I have been nixing using tums or calcium for my heartburn. Also, a few times a week, I have been drinking a couple tablespoons of ACV. ACV helps to alkalize the body. I was extremely hesitant to start using this, as I know the consequences for vinegar are harsh in the amine world. It seems to agree with me, though, so long as I use it sparingly, and only use the raw, unfiltered ACV brands. It is said that over time, ACV helps to repair the digestive tract.

PYROLURIA
The biggest changes I saw were when I did research into the link between Pyroluria and Amine Allergies. Do your own research on this – there is a very helpful closed group on Facebook called “Pyroluria.” I suggest you join and read through the documents on the site. Extremely useful information. This is not to say you have Pyroluria (and no, I still have not been tested for this – I can’t seem to dredge up the funds for a test), but there were too many commonalities for me to ignore it.

VITAMINS
I recently started dating a wonderful man who I have decided I’m going to love and squeeze into little bits forever. His knowledge in nutrition led me to start trying new supplements and replacing others with better ones. As it turns out, there is a major difference between “regular” (over-the-counter, generic, Costco-type) vitamins, and vitamins that are formulated to make your body recognize the vitamins as food. This is very important to remember when you’re buying vitamins. Price isn’t everything; Effectiveness IS.

The vitamins I now take that I have noticed the greatest benefits to my amine allergy reduction are:

  • Coenzyme B-Complex Caps, 3 per day
    With methylfolate
    (Country Life)
  • B-12 Energy Patch, 1x/week or longer, left on until it falls off
    1000mcg of Active Vitamin B-12 & 400 mac of Folic Acid
    (Healthy Habits)
  • Activated C Food Complex, 3 per day
    (New Chapter)
  • Calcium Magnesium Zinc, 3 per day
    1000 mg: 500mg: 25mg
    (Country Life)
  • Super Epa (Fish Oil), 2 per day
    (Thorne Research)
  • Every Woman’s One Daily, 1 per day
    (New Chapter Organics)
  • Vitamin D3, 2 per day
    2000 IU
    (PCC Natural Markets)
  • Iodoral (SEE NOTES…*)
    50 mg
  • Selenium (L-Selenomethionine), 1 per day when Iodoral is taken
    100 mcg
    (Solaray)

Other vitamins I take for other reasons that may/may not help the allergy but help me overall:

  • Sun Chlorella A, 15 tablets per day
  • Inflamma-Less, 1-2 soft gels per day
    (Irwin Naturals)
  • PB8 (pro-biotic acidophilus), 1 per day
    (Nutrition Now)
  • Vegenzyme, 1 before meals
    (R-U-Ved)
  • Rhodiola Rosea, 1 at waking
    120 mg
    (Gaia Herbs)

Other vitamins I take that I don’t have brands or dosage dialed in yet:

  • Glucosamine, Chondroitin, MSM

I hope that this information helps you in your journey to reclaim your body. I have come to believe that my amine allergies were a symptom of much greater problems going on. Deficiencies in vitamins, as well as toxic levels of metals, arsenic, etc. I suggest you also look into chelation and into whether doing detox for your liver (I still have not done a proper cleanse, but have been doing my best to add foods that are helpful to successful detox), kidneys, and so forth. Best to you in your low amine journey.

Love and Light,
Michelle

P.S. I know this blog is impossible with the recipes sometimes. Would you be interested in purchasing a book if I put one together? I was thinking about it, but I wanted to know whether the interest is out there…

*NOTE: Iodoral is an iodine complex that I feel did me a great amount of good. There is a specific way you need to take it, though. Starting slow… Do research on Dr. Brownstein and Iodine before starting.

You Can Do It, Too!

Go Get ‘Em, Tiger! You’ve GOT THIS!

Onion Pizza Sauce (low-amine, gluten-free, soy-free, tomato-free, dairy-free, egg-free, nut-free, paleo)

An alternative to cream-based pizza sauce, tomato-based pizza sauce, or plain oil basted pizza crusts is this delicious, simple onion sauce. This lightly tangy onion pizza sauce is excellent with vegetables on pizza, and with chicken. I marinate the chicken for my pizza in a Biscayne Citrus Rub, ascorbic acid, a little water, and safflower oil. This citrus-flavored chicken is spectacular with the low-amine, tomato-free, dairy-free onion pizza sauce.
I use allergen-free Namaste pizza crust mix and cook it quite crisp, and do up a cheese-free pizza with vegetables and the pre-cooked marinated chicken. Examples of vegetables used are chopped endive, onion, asparagus, and thin slices of green bean. Whatever vegetables you should decide to use, just remember to ENJOY!

6 C sweet onion, diced

2 1/2 C red onion

15 cloves garlic, pureed with 1/4 C water

1 C loosely packed parsley leaves, minced

1 1/2 tsp salt

1 Tbsp cornstarch

2 C beef broth

1 – 2 tsp ascorbic acid, to taste

1/2 tsp Sichuan peppercorns, crushed

4 Tbsp butter (or butter substitute, or safflower oil. I use soy-free Earth Balance butter substitute)

  • Heat large saucepan to medium high. Add butter. Add onions.
  • Cook until onions start to sweat. Add garlic, parsley, and salt. Cook until onions are cooked through.
  • Mix cornstarch in with beef broth. Add beef broth, cornstarch, and ascorbic acid. Reduce heat to medium. Cook for 25 minutes or until the liquid is fairly thickened and evaporated out. Stir often.
  • Add Sichuan peppers about 5 minutes from the end.
  • Set aside and use onion pizza sauce on your regular or gluten-free pizza crust.
AMINE BREAKDOWN:
Very Low Amine: sweet onion, red onion, garlic, parsley, salt, cornstarch, ascorbic acid, Sichuan peppercorns
Low Amine: beef broth, butter / butter substitute / safflower oil

Green Curry Chicken (low-amine, gluten-free, soy-free, dairy-free, nut-free, paleo, low-fat, low-carb)

Low-Amine Green Curry Chicken (low-amine, gluten-free, soy-free, dairy-free, nut-free, paleo, low-fat, low-carb) photo

Low-Amine Green Curry Chicken (low-amine, gluten-free, soy-free, dairy-free, nut-free, paleo, low-fat, low-carb)

I have been missing curries again, and one of my favorites is Green Curry Chicken. Unfortunately, it’s usually made with coconut milk, so I can’t eat it. You can use regular milk or cream in this recipe if you prefer the dairy, but it isn’t necessary. As is, this low-amine Green Curry Chicken was delicious. The avocado lends a wonderful creaminess to it that makes up for the fats missing by removing the coconut milk.

2 lbs boneless skinless chicken thighs, cut into bite-sized pieces

1/2 tsp salt

2 Tbsp granulated garlic powder

3 Tbsp safflower oil

2 Tbsp ginger, peeled and roughly chopped

1 1/2 tsp ascorbic acid

1 avocado, barely ripened

2 medium bundles cilantro

1 Tbsp lemongrass (white parts)

1/2 tsp cayenne

1 Tbsp water

1 1/2 tsp salt

2 C rice milk

Steamed rice (I won’t insult your intelligence. I’m going to assume you know how to do this.)

  • Make rice.
  • In a bowl, add chicken pieces, garlic powder, 1/2 tsp salt, and garlic powder. Mix until evenly coated.
  • Heat large pan to medium high and add oil. When oil is hot, add chicken. Allow to brown, then flip pieces over to brown other side. Cook for about 5 minutes, stirring often (don’t burn your chicken!), or until just barely done.
  • Pour chicken into a clean bowl and set aside.
Cooked chicken for Green Curry Chicken (low-amine, gluten-free, soy-free, dairy-free, nut-free, paleo, low-fat, low-carb) photo

Cooked chicken for Green Curry Chicken (low-amine, gluten-free, soy-free, dairy-free, nut-free, paleo, low-fat, low-carb)

  • In a food processor, add all other ingredients except rice milk. Blend until very smooth.
  • Pour puree into a pan and add rice milk and any cooking liquid left in the bowl of cooked chicken.
  • Turn heat to medium until it starts to boil and reduce to a low simmer. Cook sauce for about 5 minutes, stirring frequently.
  • Add chicken back in until both sauce and chicken are fully heated through.
  • Serve over rice.
  • Garnish with cilantro or a sprinkle of cayenne pepper, if desired.

AMINE BREAKDOWN:

Very Low Amine: salt, garlic powder, ginger, ascorbic acid, cilantro, lemongrass, green onion, water, rice milk, steamed rice

Low Amine: boneless skinless chicken thighs, safflower oil

Moderate Amine: barely ripened avocado

Very High Amine: cayenne pepper

Quick Kimchee Daikon Radish Pickles

Quick Daikon Radish Kimchee Pickles (low-amine, gluten-free,soy-free, dairy-free, nut-free, paleo, low-fat, low-carb, vegetarian, vegan) photo

Quick Daikon Radish Kimchee Pickles (low-amine, gluten-free,soy-free, dairy-free, nut-free, paleo, low-fat, low-carb, vegetarian, vegan)

I love pickles. You all probably know that by now. Here’s another pickle recipe for you. This low-amine pickle is a quick salt pickle substitute for kimchee. You can do it with traditional Napa cabbage as well, but I prefer the crisp texture of the daikon radish kimchee pickle. Enjoy!

1 large daikon radish, peeled

1/2 tsp ascorbic acid

1/2 tsp cayenne

1/2 tsp onion powder

1 tsp garlic powder

1 green onion, sliced finely

3 Tbsp salt for pickling

  • Peel daikon radish.
Peeled Daikon Radish for Low-Amine Daikon Radish Kimchee Pickles (photo)

Peeled Daikon Radish for Low-Amine Daikon Radish Kimchee Pickles

  • Use a mandoline to slice your daikon radish thinly. The thinner you slice your daikon radish, the faster they will pickle as the water is pulled out of the daikon.
  • Put in a tupperware with a good seal. Add salt and rub it in to the pickle slices.
Sliced Daikon Radish for Low-Amine Kimchee Pickles (photo)

Sliced Daikon Radish for Low-Amine Kimchee Pickles

  • Close lid and refrigerate for at least 12 hours, shaking occasionally to mix salt and liquids around.
  • When the texture of the kimchee pickle slices becomes very pliable, pour into colander and drain. Run water over the top of the low-amine pickles and massage them in your hand, squeezing out all the water each time. Do so for at least two minutes, then taste pickle. If too salty, continue massaging pickles and squeezing out salted water until saltiness is at desired level.
Squeezing salted water out of Low-Amine Kimchee Pickles (photo)

Squeezing salted water out of Low-Amine Kimchee Pickles

  • Squeeze all water out and put the kimchee daikon pickles back in the tupperware. Add all other ingredients and mix together until all are evenly coated.
  • Serve as an accompaniment to your meal or with a side of rice.

AMINE BREAKDOWN:

Very Low Amine: daikon radish, ascorbic acid, onion powder, garlic powder, green onion, salt

Very High Amine: cayenne

Cumin Bean Vegetable Soup

This soup starts with the leftover sauce from my Shredded Cumin and Cilantro Beef, so warning: Don’t start making the soup until you’ve made the Shredded Beef with Cumin and Cilantro recipe!

Cumin Bean Vegetable Soup (low-amine, gluten-free, soy-free, dairy-free, nut-free, paleo, low-fat, low-carb)

Cumin Bean Vegetable Soup (low-amine, gluten-free, soy-free, dairy-free, nut-free, paleo, low-fat, low-carb).

Now that you’ve enjoyed the Ciabattas with Shredded Beef with Cumin and Cilantro, you should have a few cups of sauce left over. But what to do with them!? Let’s make a soup! This soup is refreshing and bright, and very hearty. I use adzuki beans for their unique, sweet flavor, but you are welcome to use any bean you’d like in this Cumin Bean Vegetable Soup.

2 1/2 C leftover pureed sauce from Shredded Beef with Cumin and Cilantro

2 C beef broth

4 C vegetable broth

3 Tbsp cumin

2 Tbsp granulated garlic powder

1/2 tsp ascorbic acid

1 tsp salt

4 C leeks, halved lengthwise, then sliced thin (white parts only)

2 Tbsp butter

1 C carrots, diced

1 small zucchini, diced

3 C cooked adzuki beans + 2 C reserved liquid from cooking beans

1/4 C cilantro, minced, packed

  • In a medium heat pan, saute leeks in butter to allow for some caramelization.
Caramelizing Leeks for Cumin Bean Vegetable Soup (photo)

Caramelizing Leeks for Cumin Bean Vegetable Soup

  • Add leeks and all other ingredients except cilantro to large stock pot.
  • Bring to a boil and reduce to simmer. Simmer for 10 minutes, or until vegetables reach desired doneness.
  • Remove from heat and mix in minced cilantro.
  • Serve hot.

AMINE BREAKDOWN:

Very Low Amine: cumin, garlic powder, garlic powder, salt, leek, carrot, zucchini, adzuki beans + cooking liquid, cilantro

Low Amine: cumin, leftover pureed sauce from Shredded Beef with Cumin and Cilantrobeef brothvegetable broth, butter

Fast Dill Pickle Substitute

Dill Pickle Substitute (low-amine, gluten-free, soy-free, nut-free, dairy-free, paleo, vegetarian, vegan, low-fat, low-carb, no preservatives) photo

Low-Amine Dill Pickle Substitute

Pickles… My greatest obsession. I love them so! But of course, with an amine allergy, they’re impossible to eat. Here’s a quick and easy low-amine dill pickle substitute recipe that will leave your taste buds satisfied and your pickle craving fulfilled.

1 English cucumber

1/4 tsp ascorbic acid

1/2 tsp dill

3 Tbsp salt

  • Wash cucumber and cut ends off.
  • Use a mandoline to slice cucumber very thinly – the thinner you slice them, the faster they’ll pickle.
  • Put all cucumber slices in a tupperware with a good seal. Cover in salt and rub salt into the cucumber slices.
  • Close tupperware and put in fridge for at least 12 hours, taking out to shake tupperware occasionally.
  • When cucumber slices have reached a flexible pickle consistency, drain into a colander.
  • Run water over low-amine pickle substitute and massage, to get salt out. Massage and massage, squeezing the water out firmly. After a few rinses, taste. When the salt content tastes right to you, squeeze all water out of the pickle substitutes and place in bowl.
  • Add ascorbic acid and dill. Mix well and taste. Add more ascorbic acid or dill as needed, but note that a little goes a long way!
  • Enjoy your dill pickle substitutes!

AMINE BREAKDOWN:

Very Low Amine: cucumber, ascorbic acid, salt, dill

Greek Sweet Potato Breakfast Hash

Greek Sweet Potato Breakfast Hash (low-amine, gluten-free, soy-free, dairy-free, nut-free, paleo) photo

Greek Sweet Potato Breakfast Hash (low-amine, gluten-free, soy-free, dairy-free, nut-free, paleo), served with Black Bean Dip Quesadillas.

Sweet potato is lower in amines, and has more nutrients available to us than regular potatoes. It also makes a mean breakfast hash, and is as simple to use as regular potatoes. This recipe has a bit of a citrus kick to it from the ascorbic acid, which, with the ground beef or lamb,  gives it a slightly Greek feel.

2 C sweet potato, diced

1 1/2 C carrot, diced

1 C ground beef or lamb

1 1/2 C leeks, sliced thin, white parts only

2 Tbsp butter or butter substitute

1 Tbsp cumin, ground

2 packed Tbsp parsley

1 Tbsp garlic powder

1/2 tsp ascorbic acid

1/2 tsp salt

  • Heat a large saute pan to medium heat.
  • Add ground beef or lamb. Cook until mostly done and drain fat.
  • Add 2 Tbsp butter, then add sweet potato, leek, and parsley. Cover, and stir occasionally.
  • Cook for about 5 minutes, then add carrot and all remaining ingredients.
Greek Sweet Potato Breakfast Hash (low-amine, gluten-free, soy-free, dairy-free, nut-free, paleo) photo

Greek Sweet Potato Breakfast Hash cooking in a cast iron pan.

  • Cook uncovered while stirring often to prevent sticking. Cook until all ingredients are tender, to taste.
  • Serve hot with low-amine tomato-free ketchup substitute.
  • To add protein, I made black bean dip quesadillas (black bean dip spread on tortillas, sprinkled with salt, and heated in a pan).
Greek Sweet Potato Breakfast Hash (low-amine, gluten-free, soy-free, dairy-free, nut-free, paleo) photo

Greek Sweet Potato Breakfast Hash (low-amine, gluten-free, soy-free, dairy-free, nut-free, paleo).

AMINE BREAKDOWN:

Very Low Amine: sweet potato, carrot, leek, cumin, parsley, garlic powder, ascorbic acid, salt

Low Amine: ground beef / lamb

Black Bean Dip (low-amine, gluten-free, soy-free, dairy-free, nut-free, low-fat, low-carb, vegetarian, vegan)

Low-Amine Black Bean Dip (low-amine, gluten-free, soy-free, dairy-free, nut-free, low-fat, low-carb, vegetarian, vegan) photo

Easy Low-Amine Black Bean Dip

This simple black bean dip is a great low-amine protein source and works as a dip, spread, or simple snack / appetizer. Bring it to parties, share with your friends, and enjoy!

3 C black beans

1/3 C water

1/2 – 1 C minced cilantro, to taste

1 C minced sweet onion

1 tsp salt

1/2 tsp smoked paprika

2 Tbsp chili powder

4 medium cloves garlic, pressed

Cayenne pepper, to taste

  • Mash beans with water, garlic, spices, and salt.
  • Add onion and cilantro and mix thoroughly.
  • Taste and add more salt, cilantro, or cayenne, if desired.
  • Serve chilled.
Low-Amine Black Bean Dip served with Organic Corn Chips (photo)

Low-Amine Black Bean Dip served with Organic Corn Chips

AMINE BREAKDOWN:

Very Low Amine: black beans, water, cilantro, sweet onion, salt, garlic

Very High Amine: smoked paprika, chili powder, cayenne

Fall-off-the-Bone BBQ Beef Ribs (low-amine, gluten-free, soy-free)

Low-Amine BBQ Beef Ribs (low-amine, gluten-free, soy-free, dairy-free, nut-free, paleo) photo

Finger-Licking-Good Low-Amine BBQ Beef Ribs

I like my ribs two ways… I like them falling off the bone, finger-licking, belly-rubbing good, and I like them tough as nails and a fight to get off the bone. I think I must get it from my Korean grandma. We gnaw those bones CLEAN.
The BBQ beef rib method I will be showing you today is the kind that will most likely leave your guests in awe of what a BBQ beef rib master you are. Tender, delicious, and easy (though darn right, still messy) to eat. Big thanks to Mr. Rig It for the original BBQ beef ribs method!
Low-Amine BBQ Beef Ribs

Low-Amine BBQ Beef Ribs… Getting hungry yet?

5 lbs beef back ribs (2 racks of beef ribs)
1 Tbsp salt
1/3 C low amine BBQ sauce
2 medium white onions
water
roasting pan
grill
  • Preheat oven to 300 degrees Fahrenheit.
  • Lay ribs flat in roasting pan.
  • Set aside a third of the low-amine BBQ sauce for finishing the ribs at the very end.
  • Baste top side of beef ribs with a light layer of low-amine BBQ sauce.
  • Slice onions into thick slabs and lay them on the ribs.
  • Add water to roasting pan, enough to just barely cover ribs.
Low-Amine BBQ Beef Ribs, raw form

Low-Amine BBQ Beef Ribs prepped for their first hour of cooking.

  • Cook for one hour, then remove onions and flip. Baste lightly and replace onions on top of BBQ beef rib racks.
Low-Amine BBQ Beef Ribs after one hour cooking (photo)

Low-Amine BBQ Beef Ribs after one hour cooking.

  • Cook for three hours, flipping beef ribs at each hour interval. Ribs should be starting to fall apart at this point. You don’t want them SO tender that they literally fall off the bone – remember, you still have to move your low-amine BBQ beef ribs to the grill and finish them there. But you do want them very tender.
Low-Amine BBQ Beef Ribs after two hours cooking (photo)

Low-Amine BBQ Beef Ribs after two hours cooking. Notice the meat is starting to creep away from the ends of the bones, giving it that “Frenched rib” look.

  • Move beef ribs to a platter and start up your grill. Reserve onions to serve with your low-amine BBQ beef ribs, if desired. Feel free to cook as a whole slab (more difficult) or cut beef ribs into individual pieces, or in groups of two or three beef ribs.
Low-Amine BBQ Beef Ribs getting ready for the final grilling touch. (photo)

Low-Amine BBQ Beef Ribs getting ready for the final grilling.

  • Baste ribs on both sides.
  • Grill on medium high (get some char and color to the sauce, but try not to burn up your low-amine BBQ beef ribs) with the meatier side facing up.
Low-Amine BBQ Beef Ribs finishing on the grill (photo)

Low-Amine BBQ Beef Ribs finishing on the grill.

  • Flip, and cook meatier side down.
  • Slice ribs halfway between the bones to create equally spaced, gorgeous, low-amine BBQ beef ribs.
Low-Amine BBQ Beef Ribs, served! (photo)

Low-Amine BBQ Beef Ribs, served!

  • Microwave the reserved low-amine BBQ sauce for a few seconds to warm it, and give your BBQ beef ribs a final saucing.
  • Dig in!
Enjoy your Low-Amine BBQ Beef Ribs! (photo)

Enjoy your Low-Amine BBQ Beef Ribs!

AMINE BREAKDOWN:

Very Low Amine: salt, onion, water

Low Amine: beef ribs, low-amine BBQ sauce

Onion Pasta Sauce (low-amine, gluten-free, soy-free, tomato-free, nut-free, dairy-free, low-carb, low-fat, paleo, vegetarian, vegan)

Onion Pasta Sauce (low-amine, gluten-free, soy-free, tomato-free, nut-free, dairy-free, low-carb, low-fat, paleo, vegetarian, vegan) photo

Low-Amine Onion Sauce with Gluten-Free Quinoa Noodles

An alternative to cream- or tomato-based pasta sauces is a simple onion sauce. An added benefit to tomato-free onion sauces is that they’re great if you’re sick. Onions create heat in your body, and help you burn out the bad stuff. Since I’m still under the weather (going on two weeks now), I made myself a giant batch of this onion sauce with my gluten-free quinoa noodles.

6 C sweet onion, diced

2 1/2 C red onion

15 cloves garlic, pureed with 1/4 C water

1 C loosely packed parsley leaves, minced

1 1/2 tsp salt

1 Tbsp cornstarch

3 C beef broth

1 tsp ascorbic acid

1/2 tsp Sichuan peppercorns, crushed

4 Tbsp butter (or butter substitute. I use soy-free Earth Balance butter substitute)

  • Heat large saucepan to medium high. Add butter. Add onions.
  • Cook until onions start to sweat. Add garlic, parsley, and salt. Cook until onions are cooked through.
Low-Amine Onion Sauce for Pasta (low-amine, gluten-free, soy-free, tomato-free, nut-free, dairy-free, low-carb, low-fat, paleo, vegetarian, vegan) photo

Low-Amine Onion Sauce for Pasta

  • Mix cornstarch in with beef broth. Add beef broth, cornstarch, and ascorbic acid. Reduce heat to medium. Cook for 10 minutes, stirring often.
  • Add Sichuan peppers 5 minutes from the end.
  • Serve hot over preferred noodles.
Low-Amine Onion Sauce served over Quinoa Spaghetti Noodles (low-amine, gluten-free, soy-free, tomato-free, nut-free, dairy-free, low-carb, low-fat, paleo, vegetarian, vegan) photo

Low-Amine Onion Sauce served over Quinoa Spaghetti Noodles (low-amine, gluten-free, soy-free, tomato-free, nut-free, dairy-free, low-carb, low-fat, paleo, vegetarian, vegan)

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