Quick Kimchee Daikon Radish Pickles

Quick Daikon Radish Kimchee Pickles (low-amine, gluten-free,soy-free, dairy-free, nut-free, paleo, low-fat, low-carb, vegetarian, vegan) photo

Quick Daikon Radish Kimchee Pickles (low-amine, gluten-free,soy-free, dairy-free, nut-free, paleo, low-fat, low-carb, vegetarian, vegan)

I love pickles. You all probably know that by now. Here’s another pickle recipe for you. This low-amine pickle is a quick salt pickle substitute for kimchee. You can do it with traditional Napa cabbage as well, but I prefer the crisp texture of the daikon radish kimchee pickle. Enjoy!

1 large daikon radish, peeled

1/2 tsp ascorbic acid

1/2 tsp cayenne

1/2 tsp onion powder

1 tsp garlic powder

1 green onion, sliced finely

3 Tbsp salt for pickling

  • Peel daikon radish.
Peeled Daikon Radish for Low-Amine Daikon Radish Kimchee Pickles (photo)

Peeled Daikon Radish for Low-Amine Daikon Radish Kimchee Pickles

  • Use a mandoline to slice your daikon radish thinly. The thinner you slice your daikon radish, the faster they will pickle as the water is pulled out of the daikon.
  • Put in a tupperware with a good seal. Add salt and rub it in to the pickle slices.
Sliced Daikon Radish for Low-Amine Kimchee Pickles (photo)

Sliced Daikon Radish for Low-Amine Kimchee Pickles

  • Close lid and refrigerate for at least 12 hours, shaking occasionally to mix salt and liquids around.
  • When the texture of the kimchee pickle slices becomes very pliable, pour into colander and drain. Run water over the top of the low-amine pickles and massage them in your hand, squeezing out all the water each time. Do so for at least two minutes, then taste pickle. If too salty, continue massaging pickles and squeezing out salted water until saltiness is at desired level.
Squeezing salted water out of Low-Amine Kimchee Pickles (photo)

Squeezing salted water out of Low-Amine Kimchee Pickles

  • Squeeze all water out and put the kimchee daikon pickles back in the tupperware. Add all other ingredients and mix together until all are evenly coated.
  • Serve as an accompaniment to your meal or with a side of rice.

AMINE BREAKDOWN:

Very Low Amine: daikon radish, ascorbic acid, onion powder, garlic powder, green onion, salt

Very High Amine: cayenne

Fast Dill Pickle Substitute

Dill Pickle Substitute (low-amine, gluten-free, soy-free, nut-free, dairy-free, paleo, vegetarian, vegan, low-fat, low-carb, no preservatives) photo

Low-Amine Dill Pickle Substitute

Pickles… My greatest obsession. I love them so! But of course, with an amine allergy, they’re impossible to eat. Here’s a quick and easy low-amine dill pickle substitute recipe that will leave your taste buds satisfied and your pickle craving fulfilled.

1 English cucumber

1/4 tsp ascorbic acid

1/2 tsp dill

3 Tbsp salt

  • Wash cucumber and cut ends off.
  • Use a mandoline to slice cucumber very thinly – the thinner you slice them, the faster they’ll pickle.
  • Put all cucumber slices in a tupperware with a good seal. Cover in salt and rub salt into the cucumber slices.
  • Close tupperware and put in fridge for at least 12 hours, taking out to shake tupperware occasionally.
  • When cucumber slices have reached a flexible pickle consistency, drain into a colander.
  • Run water over low-amine pickle substitute and massage, to get salt out. Massage and massage, squeezing the water out firmly. After a few rinses, taste. When the salt content tastes right to you, squeeze all water out of the pickle substitutes and place in bowl.
  • Add ascorbic acid and dill. Mix well and taste. Add more ascorbic acid or dill as needed, but note that a little goes a long way!
  • Enjoy your dill pickle substitutes!

AMINE BREAKDOWN:

Very Low Amine: cucumber, ascorbic acid, salt, dill

Black Bean Dip (low-amine, gluten-free, soy-free, dairy-free, nut-free, low-fat, low-carb, vegetarian, vegan)

Low-Amine Black Bean Dip (low-amine, gluten-free, soy-free, dairy-free, nut-free, low-fat, low-carb, vegetarian, vegan) photo

Easy Low-Amine Black Bean Dip

This simple black bean dip is a great low-amine protein source and works as a dip, spread, or simple snack / appetizer. Bring it to parties, share with your friends, and enjoy!

3 C black beans

1/3 C water

1/2 – 1 C minced cilantro, to taste

1 C minced sweet onion

1 tsp salt

1/2 tsp smoked paprika

2 Tbsp chili powder

4 medium cloves garlic, pressed

Cayenne pepper, to taste

  • Mash beans with water, garlic, spices, and salt.
  • Add onion and cilantro and mix thoroughly.
  • Taste and add more salt, cilantro, or cayenne, if desired.
  • Serve chilled.
Low-Amine Black Bean Dip served with Organic Corn Chips (photo)

Low-Amine Black Bean Dip served with Organic Corn Chips

AMINE BREAKDOWN:

Very Low Amine: black beans, water, cilantro, sweet onion, salt, garlic

Very High Amine: smoked paprika, chili powder, cayenne

Beet and Carrot Salad

Beet and Carrot Salad (low-amine, gluten-free, soy-free, dairy-free, tomato-free, nut-free, paleo, vegetarian, vegan) photo

Beet and Carrot Salad (low-amine, gluten-free, soy-free, dairy-free, tomato-free, nut-free, paleo, vegetarian, vegan)

This shredded, low-amine beet and carrot salad has a cumin and lemony kick to it that makes it a great side dish for savory main dishes. Beet and carrot are naturally low-amine, and the beets add a sweetness to the salad from its natural sugars, particularly if you choose organic beets (organic beets are much higher in flavor).

1 beet (about 2C)

8 medium carrots (about 2C)

1/4 C safflower oil

1/2 C parsley, finely minced

1/2 tsp sea salt

1 tsp ascorbic acid

1 1/2 tsp cumin

1/2 tsp cumin seeds

dash cayenne

Beet and Carrot Salad (low-amine, gluten-free, soy-free, dairy-free, tomato-free, nut-free, paleo, vegetarian, vegan) photo

Beet and Carrot Salad (low-amine, gluten-free, soy-free, dairy-free, tomato-free, nut-free, paleo, vegetarian, vegan)

  • Wash and trim carrots. Peel beet.
  • Using a cheese grater or a food processor, grate beet and carrot and add to a large mixing bowl.
  • Add all other ingredients and mix well.
  • Allow to marinate for at least 20 minutes before serving.
Beet and Carrot Salad (low-amine, gluten-free, soy-free, dairy-free, tomato-free, nut-free, paleo, vegetarian, vegan) photo

Beet and Carrot Salad (low-amine, gluten-free, soy-free, dairy-free, tomato-free, nut-free, paleo, vegetarian, vegan)

AMINE BREAKDOWN:

Very Low Amine: beet, carrot, parsley, sea salt, ascorbic acid, cumin, cumin seeds

Low Amine: safflower oil

Very High Amine: cayenne

Tofu Bites (low-amine, gluten-free, dairy-free, nut-free, paleo, tomato-free, vegan, vegetarian)

Tofu Bites (low-amine, gluten-free, diary-free, nut-free, tomato-free, paleo, vegan, vegetarian) photo

Tofu Bites (low-amine, gluten-free, diary-free, nut-free, tomato-free, paleo, vegan, vegetarian)

Sometimes I have a hard time getting enough protein in my diet. I don’t always feel like eating (or dealing with prepping and cooking) meat. Tofu is a great, low-amine option in lieu of meat, and I like to utilize it by making a lot at once and eating it for a couple days. Soft tofu is the lowest in amines, whereas firm tofu is higher. Once baked, I prefer the texture of soft tofu to firm tofu, which I feel is almost too firm at that point. But whatever floats your boat. I seasoned half of this batch with my Cajun Spice Mix, and the other half with mustard-free (mustard is high in amines) curry powder, but feel free to use any seasoning you’d like, or none at all.

3 blocks tofu

  • Preheat oven to 275 degrees
  • Cut tofu into squares.
  • Arrange on a cookie sheet and season, if desired.
Low-amine tofu bites, seasoned and ready to bake (photo)

Low-amine tofu bites, seasoned and ready to bake.

  • Bake for 2-4 hours, or until they reach desired texture. I like mine more firm, so I let them go longer. If you like yours softer, cook for less time.
Here's one way to use them... I stir fried some brussels sprouts and celery, added my low-amine BBQ sauce, and dropped in the tofu bites. Tossed together till everything was cooked and warm, and served it over a serving of rice. Simple and delicious!

Here's one way to use them... I stir fried some brussels sprouts and celery, added my low-amine BBQ sauce, and dropped in the tofu bites. Tossed together till everything was cooked and warm, and served it over a serving of rice. Simple and delicious!

AMINE BREAKDOWN:

Low Amine: soft tofu

Moderate Amine: firm tofu

Low-amine, Gluten-free Chinese Scallion Pancakes with Dipping Sauce

Low-Amine Chinese Scallion Pancakes with "Soy Sauce" Dipping Sauce (photo)

Low-Amine Chinese Scallion Pancakes with "Soy" Dipping Sauce (low-amine, gluten-free, soy-free, dairy-free, nut-free, tomato-free, vegetarian, vegan).

These Chinese scallion pancakes were tasty. Because I changed the all-purpose flour to a gluten-free all-purpose flour (Bob’s Mill brand), the texture was different than when I had made them previously. However, they were still very tasty and I’d eat them again in a heartbeat. The low-amine sauce added a nice touch to the Chinese scallion pancakes that I felt was necessary, given the tougher nature of the gluten-free flour.

1 1/2 – 1 3/4 C gluten-free all-purpose flour

3/4 C warm water

1/4 tsp salt

1 Tbsp sesame oil substitute

1/2 C finely chopped green onions

2 Tbsp safflower oil mixed with 2 Tbsp sesame oil substitute (for frying), divided

Flour for flouring counter top

Low-Amine Chinese Scallion Pancake Dipping Sauce:

2 Tbsp soy sauce substitute

1/2 tsp ascorbic acid

1 Tbsp sesame oil substitute

2 Tbsp water

1 Tbsp grated ginger

1 tsp agave nectar or sugar

  • Dissolve salt into warm water.
  • Mix flour into water. Mix until doughy – if it’s too thick, add a tiny bit of water at a time until the proper texture. If too thin, add more flour.
  • Flour the counter top.
  • Knead and break up into 8 evenly-sized balls of dough.
  • Press/roll each ball flat, and brush with sesame oil substitute. Sprinkle with green onions and roll dough into a tube.
  • Press tube flat, spiral-side down, and roll/press into a pancake. Mine were about 3″ across. I would have liked them to be a bit bigger, but the gluten-free dough broke apart too easily when more thin. Do what works for you.
  • Dust with flour to ensure the pancake will rest easily and won’t stick while you roll out the rest of the low-amine Chinese scallion pancakes.
  • Pour half the oil into a large, non-stick frying pan. On medium heat, fry four at a time until golden brown on each side. I found that I liked mine more cooked rather than less, since gluten-free flour has a  tendency to have a grainier texture when not cooked through.
  • Each side of the pancakes cooked about 3-5 minutes. Set aside on paper towels to drain.
  • Pour remaining oil in pan and repeat.
  • Cut each low-amine Chinese scallion pancake into quarters.
Low-Amine Chinese Scallion Pancake Dipping Sauce:

AMINE BREAKDOWN:

Very Low Amine: gluten-free flour, water, salt, green onion, ascorbic acid, ginger

Low Amine: sesame oil substitute, safflower oil, soy sauce substitute, agave nectar / sugar

Pea Shoots

Pea Shoots sauteed in Garlic, Ginger, and Onion (low-amine, gluten-free, soy-free, dairy-free, tomato-free, nut-free, paleo, vegan, vegetarian) photo.

Pea Shoots sautéed in Garlic, Ginger, and Onion (low-amine, gluten-free, soy-free, dairy-free, tomato-free, nut-free, vegan, vegetarian).

Pea shoots are a low-amine, colorful, tender, fun dish to add to any meal (who doesn’t like a vegetable with so many curly-Q’s in it?). It’s light, and comes together very well with the low-amine sauce used. It is simple to make, and can work as a low-amine entrée  or low-amine side dish.

1 bundle pea shoots (tight bundle should be about 4″ in diameter)

1 Tbsp safflower oil

1 Tbsp sesame oil substitute

2 Tbsp soy sauce substitute

2 tsp sugar

1 tsp corn starch

1 Tbsp ginger, grated

6 cloves garlic, chopped

2 Tbsp red onion, chopped finely

  • Mix sugar, sesame oil substitute, soy sauce substitute, corn starch, and ginger together. Stir until sugar and corn starch are dissolved. Set aside.
  • Heat 1 Tbsp safflower oil in wok on high temperature.
  • Add garlic and red onion. Cook until fragrant and onions are starting to go translucent.
  • Add pea shoots and toss rapidly so that the pea shoots cook quickly and evenly. When they start to soften, add sauce mix and continue tossing pea shoots.
  • When cooked to desired doneness, remove from heat and plate immediately.
  • Serve while hot.

AMINE BREAKDOWN:

Very Low Amine: pea shoots, corn starch, ginger, garlic, red onion

Low Amine: safflower oil, sesame oil substitutesoy sauce substitute, sugar

Pickles, pickles, pickles, and all Low-Amine


Low-Amine "Soy Sauce" Carrot Pickles, Low-Amine Cucumber Pickles, and Low-Amine "Kimchee" Radish Pickles (photo)

Low-Amine "Soy Sauce" Carrot Pickles, Low-Amine Traditional Cucumber Pickles, and Low-Amine "Kimchee" Radish Pickles.

I made three kinds of low-amine pickles last week. All are made with low-amine ingredients (carrot, cucumber, and radish), and prepared in a low-amine method. The vegetables had to salt in the fridge overnight, but that’s about the most ageing these low-amine pickles did.

6 medium carrots

4 large pickling cucumbers (or one narrow English cucumber)

1 bunch radishes

1/4 C salt

1 1/2 tsp ascorbic acid

1 Tbsp soy sauce substitute

1 Tbsp sesame oil substitute

1 Tbsp sugar

1/4 tsp garlic powder

1/4 tsp onion powder

1/4 tsp cayenne powder

1 green onion, green parts only

  • Wash and cut all vegetables and keep separate. You can do yours however you’d like, but I sliced the cucumbers and radishes thinly, and julienned the carrots. Remember to keep them thin.
  • Salt liberally and rub salt into vegetables.
  • Let sit in salt overnight. Give them the occasional rubbing/mixing, and drain off excess liquids that have collected, if you can.
  • Rinse off vegetables very well. I rinse them at least three times each and give the vegetables a firm massage and squeezing out, to remove as much salt and water as possible. Continue repeating this until they are slightly salty, but not unpalatable.
  • Coat vegetables in about 1/2 tsp ascorbic acid each, or to taste. It should have a  “pickled” taste, but not be too tart.
  • Add sugar, soy sauce substitute and sesame oil substitute to the carrots and mix together very well, until sugar dissolves completely.
  • Slice one green stem of green onion into very thin rings and set aside.
  • Add garlic powder, onion powder, and cayenne to radishes. Mix well, and add green onion slices in. Toss together.
  • Present together on a dish, or separately. Chill until used. They will keep for a few days in the fridge.
Pickled carrots, pickled cucumbers, pickled radishes (photo).

Pickled carrots, pickled cucumbers, pickled radishes, all done low-amine.

AMINE BREAKDOWN:

Very Low Amine: carrot, cucumber, radish, salt, ascorbic acid, garlic powder, onion powder, green onion 

Low Amine: soy sauce substitute, sesame oil substitute, sugar

Very High Amine: cayenne powder

Related articles

Garlic Green Beans (low-amine, gluten-free, soy-free, dairy-free, egg-free, nut-free, paleo, tomato-free, low-fat, low-carb, vegan, vegetarian)

Low-amine Garlic Green Beans (photo)

Low-amine Garlic Green Beans (low-amine, gluten-free, soy-free, dairy-free, nut-free, tomato-free, egg-free, fish-free, paleo, low-fat, low-carb, vegetarian, vegan).

This simple, low-amine side dish is delicious, filling, and easy. Low-amine Garlic Green Beans are a lovely accompaniment to almost any meal.

1 lb green beans, stem-end removed

2 Tbsp garlic, pressed

2 Tbsp safflower oil

Salt & Pepper to taste

Low-Amine Green Beans, Washed and Prepped (photo)

Low-Amine Green Beans, Washed and Prepped.

  • Cook green beans in a double-boiler to steam them. When they have reached just under-done, remove from heat.
  • Heat oil in a large non-stick pan. Add garlic and cook till fragrant.
  • Add green beans and toss well. Cook until green beans have reached desired doneness. Sprinkle with salt & pepper.
  • Serve hot.

AMINE BREAKDOWN:

Very Low Amine: green beans (low in histamine, high in tyramine), garlic, salt, pepper

Low Amine: safflower oil

Roasted Fennel & Celery Root (low-amine, gluten-free, soy-free, dairy-free, paleo, vegan, low-fat, low-carb)

Low-amine roasted fennel and celery root (low-amine, gluten-free, soy-free, dairy-free, egg-free, fish-free, paleo, low-fat, low-carb, vegetarian, vegan) photo

Low-amine roasted fennel and celery root.

This easy side dish is a nice, flavorful addition to a meal, but not overpowering (as celery and  licorice can be at times). It is a very easy low-amine recipe that looks like you put a lot of thought into it. I love that. ❤
1 large bulb fennel
1 medium celery root (about the same size as the fennel)
3 Tbsp safflower oil
salt
pepper
  • Preheat oven to 400 degrees.
  • Use 1 Tbsp oil to grease a cookie sheet.
  • Cut off stems from fennel, and peel celery root.
  • Cut fennel and celery root in half lengthwise.
  • Cut into wedges like apple slices and toss them in a bowl with 2 Tbsp oil, salt, and pepper until well-coated. Lay out pieces on the cookies sheet.
Low-amine fennel and celery root (low-amine, gluten-free, soy-free, dairy-free, egg-free, fish-free, paleo, low-fat, low-carb, vegetarian, vegan) photo

Low-amine fennel and celery root.

  • Roast at for 10 minutes, then flip.
  • Roast for 6 minutes on the other side.
  • Serve.
AMINE BREAKDOWN:
Very Low Amine: fennel, celery root, salt, black pepper
Low Amine: safflower oil