Cumin Bean Vegetable Soup

This soup starts with the leftover sauce from my Shredded Cumin and Cilantro Beef, so warning: Don’t start making the soup until you’ve made the Shredded Beef with Cumin and Cilantro recipe!

Cumin Bean Vegetable Soup (low-amine, gluten-free, soy-free, dairy-free, nut-free, paleo, low-fat, low-carb)

Cumin Bean Vegetable Soup (low-amine, gluten-free, soy-free, dairy-free, nut-free, paleo, low-fat, low-carb).

Now that you’ve enjoyed the Ciabattas with Shredded Beef with Cumin and Cilantro, you should have a few cups of sauce left over. But what to do with them!? Let’s make a soup! This soup is refreshing and bright, and very hearty. I use adzuki beans for their unique, sweet flavor, but you are welcome to use any bean you’d like in this Cumin Bean Vegetable Soup.

2 1/2 C leftover pureed sauce from Shredded Beef with Cumin and Cilantro

2 C beef broth

4 C vegetable broth

3 Tbsp cumin

2 Tbsp granulated garlic powder

1/2 tsp ascorbic acid

1 tsp salt

4 C leeks, halved lengthwise, then sliced thin (white parts only)

2 Tbsp butter

1 C carrots, diced

1 small zucchini, diced

3 C cooked adzuki beans + 2 C reserved liquid from cooking beans

1/4 C cilantro, minced, packed

  • In a medium heat pan, saute leeks in butter to allow for some caramelization.
Caramelizing Leeks for Cumin Bean Vegetable Soup (photo)

Caramelizing Leeks for Cumin Bean Vegetable Soup

  • Add leeks and all other ingredients except cilantro to large stock pot.
  • Bring to a boil and reduce to simmer. Simmer for 10 minutes, or until vegetables reach desired doneness.
  • Remove from heat and mix in minced cilantro.
  • Serve hot.

AMINE BREAKDOWN:

Very Low Amine: cumin, garlic powder, garlic powder, salt, leek, carrot, zucchini, adzuki beans + cooking liquid, cilantro

Low Amine: cumin, leftover pureed sauce from Shredded Beef with Cumin and Cilantrobeef brothvegetable broth, butter

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Tomato-Free Chili (low-amine, gluten-free, soy-free, dairy-free, tomato-free, nightshade-free, paleo, low-carb)

Tomato-Free Chili (low-amine, nightshade-free, gluten-free, soy-free, dairy-free, tomato-free, paleo, nut-free, low-carb) photo

Low-Amine Tomato-Free, Nightshade-Free Chili served with rice.

I haven’t been able to eat a proper bowl of chili for over a year now. How I have missed chili! But chili is so very tomato, pepper and nightshade-based. So for someone on a low-amine diet, chili is pretty much amine HELL. I had looked for a good recipe for  nightshade-free chili, or at least tomato-free chili, but had no luck, until I found one at Eating With Food Allergies that made a great base. I thought the original recipe made a great canvass for the tweaks I was about to make. The tomato-free, nightshade-free chili turned out phenomenal! I will never have to lament over tomatoes in my chili again!

Makes approximately 15 bowls (this is a large batch – halve recipes for fewer people, or freeze if not sensitive to amines in frozen leftovers)

2 lb lean ground beef

4 C chicken stock

2 Tbsp safflower oil

1/2 C water

2 medium red onions, chopped

12 cloves garlic, chopped (1/3 C)

4 large carrots, diced (1 1/4 C)

5 ribs celery, diced (2 C)

4 cans black beans

3 Tbsp cumin

2 Tbsp turmeric

1 1/2 tsp clove powder

1 Tbsp coriander

4 tsp sea salt

1 Tbsp liquid smoke

1/2 tsp Sichuan peppercorns, smashed

1 Tbsp molasses

1 1/2 Tbsp corn starch, mixed with 1/4 C cold water

1/4 C fresh minced cilantro, for garnish

  • In a stock pot over medium heat, cook ground beef with onions, oil, and 1/2 C water. Cover, stirring occasionally to break apart beef.
  • When cooked, add in garlic, celery, carrots, broth, cumin, turmeric, clove, coriander, salt, and liquid smoke. Cook for 20 minutes, covered, stirring occasionally.
  • Add to the chili your crushed Sichuan peppercorns, molasses, and cornstarch/water mixture. Stir well.
  • Add black beans to chili. Stir well and cook for another 10 minutes over medium-low heat. Stir fairly often to prevent burning at the bottom.
  • Note: If you can tolerate chili powder or cayenne, feel free to taste and add to your heart’s content, if desired. Both are nightshades and high in amines.
  • Remove from heat and allow to sit for 10 minutes before serving to allow flavors to “steep.”
  • Serve your wonderful, low-amine, tomato-free, nightshade-free chili hot on its own, or with rice. Garnish with freshly minced cilantro. Enjoy!!!
AMINE BREAKDOWN:
Very Low Amine: water, red onion, garlic, carrot, celery, black beans, cumin, turmeric, coriander, sea salt, liquid smoke, Sichuan peppercorns, corn starch, cilantro
Low Amine: lean ground beef, chicken stock, safflower oil, molasses
High Amine: clove powder

Fennel Leek Soup (low-amine, gluten-free, soy-free, dairy-free, nut-free, low-fat, low-carb, paleo, vegetarian, vegan)

Low-Amine Leek Fennel Soup (low-amine, gluten-free, soy-free, dairy-free, nut-free, nightshade-free, tomato-free, low-fat, low-carb, vegetarian, vegan, paleo) photo

Low-Amine Leek Fennel Soup (low-amine, gluten-free, soy-free, dairy-free, nut-free, nightshade-free, tomato-free, low-fat, low-carb, vegetarian, vegan, paleo)

This creamy (dairy-free) simple low-amine soup makes a nice light lunch or a good starter for a meal. It’s an easy way to get your vegetables in, too.

1 1/2 C onion

1 C frozen peas

1 leek, cut lengthwise and then into ovals (set aside 1/2 C for soup topping)

1 medium bulb fennel (about 2 C), shaved (set aside 1/2 C for soup topping)

1 C Italian parsley leaves, chopped

2 large cloves garlic, chopped

1 Tbsp rosemary

1 1/2 tsp ginger, minced

1 Tbsp rubbed sage

1/2 tsp salt (or more, to taste)

1/2 tsp ascorbic cid

1/2 tsp black pepper

4 1/2 C vegetable stock

3 Tbsp safflower oil, divided (2 Tbsp, 1 Tbsp)

  • Set aside 1/2 C leek, 1/2 C fennel, and 1 Tbsp oil in a small separate pan.
Fennel and Leek in a separate pan for making low-amine fennel leek soup topping (photo)

Fennel and Leek in a separate pan for making low-amine fennel leek soup topping

  • In a large pan or stock pot, saute remaining oil (2 Tbsp), onion, leek, fennel, parsley, garlic, and ginger. Cook until tender.
Low-amine fennel leek soup cooking (photo)

Low-amine fennel leek soup cooking

  • Add peas, rosemary, sage, salt, ascorbic acid, black pepper, and vegetable stock. Cover and simmer on medium low until very tender, about 10 minutes.
  • While soup is simmering, saute the leek and fennel in the separate pan. Caramelize the ingredients, then set aside.
  • Using an immersion blender or in batches in a food processor, puree the main stock pot soup ingredients until very smooth.
Pureeing the leek fennel soup (low-amine, gluten-free, soy-free, dairy-free, nut-free, nightshade-free, tomato-free, low-fat, low-carb, vegetarian, vegan, paleo) photo

Pureeing the leek fennel soup (low-amine, gluten-free, soy-free, dairy-free, nut-free, nightshade-free, tomato-free, low-fat, low-carb, vegetarian, vegan, paleo)

  • Serve in shallow bowls, with a large pinch of the caramelized leek and fennel over the top.
AMINE BREAKDOWN:
Very Low Amine: onion, leek, fennel, parsley, garlic, rosemary, ginger, sage, salt, ascorbic acid, black pepper
Low Amine: peas, vegetable stock, safflower oil

Quick Get-Well Soup (low-amine, gluten-free, soy-free, dairy-free, nut-free, nightshade-free)

Low-Amine Get-Well Soup (low-amine, gluten-free, soy-free, dairy-free, nut-free, tomato-free, nightshade-free, paleo, low-fat, low-carb) photo

Low-Amine Get-Well Soup (low-amine, gluten-free, soy-free, dairy-free, nut-free, tomato-free, nightshade-free, paleo, low-fat, low-carb)

I’m sick. Lord I hate being sick. So I’ve made myself a quick and dirty get-well soup out of the low-amine vegetables in the house. Fast, easy, and one bowl in, I am already starting to feel better. Healthy soups are good medicine!

2 onions, sliced into “C rings”

2 carrots, chopped

3 green onions, chopped

1/2 bundle asparagus, ends trimmed, chopped

1/2 bundle cilantro (about 1 C), chopped

1/4 daikon radish, chopped (about 1 C)

1 small head napa cabbage, chopped fairly thin

12 medium to large cloves garlic

1/4 C ginger

1/2C soy sauce substitute

4 C beef broth

2 C vegetable broth

3 Tbsp safflower oil

  • Heat oil in stock pot on medium. Add cut onions, green onions, and carrot. Cook until onions are starting to go translucent.
  • Add chopped cilantro, asparagus, daikon, napa cabbage, and soy sauce substitute. Stir and cover with lid. Cook for about 5 minutes.
  • In a small food processor, puree garlic and ginger. Add water as necessary to keep it moving.
  • Add puree, beef broth, and vegetable broth to the pot. Stir.
  • Bring to a boil and then reduce to a simmer. Cover.
  • Cook low-amine soup for 15 minutes, or until cabbage has reached desired doneness.
  • Serve hot.

AMINE BREAKDOWN:

Very Low Amine: onions, carrot, green onion, asparagus, cilantro, daikon radish, napa cabbage, garlic, ginger
Low Amine: soy sauce substitutebeef brothvegetable broth, safflower oil

Braised Octopus and Choy Sum

Braised Octopus and Choy Sum (gluten-free, soy-free, dairy-free, egg-free, nut-free, low-fat, low-carb) photo

Low-Amine Braised Octopus and Choy Sum (gluten-free, soy-free, dairy-free, egg-free, nut-free, tomato-free, low-fat, low-carb).

Low-amine braised octopus sounded like a good dinner idea at the time. Two hours later, I was proven right. It was delicious. The octopus and choy sum is served in a Spring Onion broth that balances the saltier low-amine “soy sauce” flavor a bit and makes it more delicate. This dish can be served split into two main components (as shown above), or served all together. I would have preferred to use fresh octopus, as it is both tastier and lower in amines, but I was not able to. If you can get fresh octopus, do so!

2 lb octopus, cut into small pieces.

20 pcs. baby choy sum (or baby bok choy)

2/3 C soy sauce substitute

2 medium yellow onions

5 Tbsp ginger slices, divided (3T, 2T)

5 C vegetable, chicken, or beef broth

10 cloves garlic, pressed

1 Tbsp butter or safflower oil

1 bundle green onions

2 kombu pieces

1/2 tsp nigella seeds (optional)

"Soy sauce" braised octopus and onions, served in spring onion broth (photo)

"Soy sauce" braised octopus and onions, served in spring onion broth.

  • Make soy sauce substitute, if you haven’t already. I suggest making a double batch so that you have some for later, but it’s up to you.
  • Preheat oven to 300 degrees.
  • Cut one onion into rings and line the bottom of a dutch oven with the rings. Add about 3 Tbsp ginger slices on top.
Onion and ginger in the dutch oven for low-amine braised octopus and choy sum (photo)

Onion and ginger in the dutch oven for low-amine braised octopus and choy sum.

  • Add octopus on top of the ginger and onion, and pour 2/3 C soy sauce substitute over the top. Close the dutch oven and put it in the oven. Set timer for 1 hour 20 minutes.
Octopus (for lower amine, please use fresh octopus) (photo)

Octopus (for lower amine, please use fresh octopus)

"Soy sauce" poured over the top of octopus, ginger, and onion (photo)

"Soy sauce" poured over the top of octopus, ginger, and onion.

  • Roughly chop remaining onion, and cut 2 Tbsp ginger into matchsticks.
  • Heat butter/oil and cook garlic until starting to brown. Remove from heat.
  • In a larger pot, add onion, ginger, kombu, garlic, and broth. Bring to a boil and reduce to a low simmer. Cover.
Kombu for spring onion broth (photo)

Kombu for spring onion broth.

  • When the timer goes off, add well-washed choy sum to the dutch oven. Return to the oven for another 40 minutes.
Low-amine choy sum to be added to "soy sauce" braised octopus (photo)

Low-amine choy sum to be added to "soy sauce" braised octopus

  • Strain broth out using a colander, and return to the pot. Keep broth on low and warm.
  • Wash green onions and cut off roots. Discard roots.
  • Slice green onions on a sharp diagonal. 5 minutes before the octopus is done, turn heat on broth back up, and add green onions. Cook until lightly tender.
  • Scoop out octopus and choy sum and serve in a deep dish or bowl. You can separate the choy sum from the octopus and onion, or serve it together.
Low-amine baby choy sum sprinkled with nigella seeds, surrounded by spring onion broth. (photo)

Low-amine baby choy sum sprinkled with nigella seeds, plated floating in spring onion broth.

  • Ladle the spring onion broth around it, and serve with a sprinkle of nigella seeds.
Low-amine "soy sauce" braised octopus and choy sum with a spring onion broth (photo)

Low-amine "soy sauce" braised octopus and choy sum with a spring onion broth.

AMINE BREAKDOWN:

Very Low Amine: baby choy sum (or bok choy), onion, ginger, garlic, green onion

Low Amine: octopus, soy sauce substitutebroth, butter / safflower oil

High Amine: kombu pieces

Unknown: nigella seeds (optional)

Tennessee White Chili (low-amine, gluten-free, soy-free, tomato-free)

Thank you, Food Republic, for always having gorgeous food photos that inspire me… and make me very hungry. On top of that, you’ve provided a rare treat! Your Tennessee White Chili recipe is totally low-amine, with the only tweak for us low-amine dieters being a change in cheeses from Jack to Mozzarella or Feta cheese.

Tennessee White Chili

Tennessee White Chili

Here are the ingredients, and the amines in the ingredients. I will leave the published recipe for Tennessee White Chili for you to discover on Food Republic.

Serves 6
1 Tbsp canola oil
1 C onion, chopped
1 tsp garlic, minced
1 1/2 lbs cooked chicken breast, cut into small cubes
3 15-ounce cans Great Northern or cannellini beans (for lower amine, use dried and cooked beans)
2 Tbsp cilantro, chopped
2 tsp ground cumin
1/4 tsp salt
1/4 tsp cayenne pepper
chicken broth, to desired consistency
shredded monterey jack Mozzarella or Feta, to garnish
AMINE BREAKDOWN:
Very Low Amine: onion, garlic, beans, cilantro, cumin, salt
Low Amine: skinless chicken breast, canola oil, chicken broth, Mozzarella or Feta cheese
Very High Amine: cayenne pepper
Published in: on February 6, 2012 at 8:32 am  Comments (2)  

No-tomato Tomato Soup (gluten-free, soy-free, low-amine, tomato-free)

No-Tomato Tomato Soup (low-amine, tomato-free, gluten-free, soy-free, nightshade-free) (photo)

No-Tomato Tomato Soup (low-amine, tomato-free, gluten-free, soy-free)

I miss tomato soup like crazy. Like nothing I’ve ever missed before. Living with no tomatoes is like living without air, or sex, or chocolate. Oh, wait, I have to live without chocolate, too. Well… Scratch that last one. But a tomato-free existence is not one I care for very much. So I’ve been on a mission to recreate tomato soup. Tomato soup with no tomato in it.

Tomato-free tomato soup? Is that possible? I’ve already pulled off a no-tomato ketchup, and a tomato-free BBQ sauce. Perhaps tomato-free tomato soup is possible, too…

After about 3 hours in the kitchen working on alterations, this is as close as I have come so far. I’m sure there is more I can do with it, but my taste buds aren’t tasting anymore. Rather than make you wait another few months for the recipe, I’m going to go ahead and post it. It’s close enough to be a satisfying substitute, though it’s not as close as I would like to have it to be 100% happy with it. If you have suggestions, please feel free to leave a comment below.

1 C cranberries

1 2/3 C carrots (about 3 carrots)

1 large pear

30 leaves basil, fresh (about 1/3 C loosely packed, sliced finely)

1 Tbsp onion

4 ribs celery

2 C chicken stock (vegetable stock, if vegan/vegetarian)

1 small clove garlic

3 Tbsp sugar

1/8 tsp salt

1/4 tsp black pepper

1/8 tsp clove, ground

1 tsp ascorbic acid

1 large bay leaf

2 C water

Juice of 1/2 lime

  • Pull tough fibers on the outside of celery ribs off and discard. Chop celery.
  • Chop carrots.
  • Cut up pear and discard core.
  • Simmer all ingredients (except for basil, water and lime juice) in a large pot for 25 minutes, covered.
  • Remove from heat.
  • Puree (in sections, if necessary) in a food processor until very smooth.
  • Add 2 C water, lime juice, and the majority of your thinly sliced basil to the pureed batch and mix together well.
  • Serve hot and garnish with a pinch of basil on top, and a grind of freshly ground black pepper.

AMINE BREAKDOWN:

Very Low Amine: carrot, pear, basil, onion, celery, garlic, salt, black pepper, ascorbic acid, bay leaf, water

Low Amine: chicken stock, sugar

High Amine: cranberry, clove, lime

Featured on Gluten Free Homemaker.

Chestnut Soup

Low-amine chestnut soup

Chestnut soup

This soup is nutty and earthy, and great as a low-amine appetizer or entree. It’s very easy to make, and fits with a number of allergy restrictions. Originally, I found a similar recipe on Chow.com, but when I made it, I found it unsatisfying and not nearly nutty enough. With several tweaks, I think the flavor developed a much deeper flavor. However, I also discovered upon further research that chestnut is high in amines, so buyer beware!

3 Tbsp unsalted butter (1/4 stick)

1 Tbsp safflower oil

1.5 C coarsely chopped shallots

4 medium semi-sweet apples (Gala, Braeburn, etc), chopped (about 4 C)

3 Tbsp finely chopped sage leaves

3 ribs celery, chopped

1 carrot, chopped

10 C whole, peeled chestnuts

2 cups vegetable broth

2 C water

1 tsp fresh cracked black pepper

pinch nutmeg

Salt, to taste

  • Heat stove to medium and melt butter in a large pot.
  • Add oil, shallots, chestnuts, celery, and carrot. Cook about 5 minutes.
  • Reduce heat to medium-low.
  • Add water, vegetable broth, salt, pepper, nutmeg, and sage. Simmer for about 15 minutes.
  • Using an immersion blender if you have one, or a blender/food processor if you don’t, puree the soup.
  • Season with salt, to taste.
  • Garnish with minced sage leaves or parsley and serve with crostini or bread, if available.

AMINE BREAKDOWN:

Very Low Amine: shallots, apple, sage, celery, carrot, vegetable broth, water, pepper, salt

Low Amine: butter, safflower oil

High Amine: chestnut, nutmeg

Low Amine Turkey Soup

Turkey soup

Low amine turkey soup

Just in time for Thanksgiving. Save your bones and turkey scraps (omit the skin to make it a low amine turkey soup). Every year at the office we do an office Thanksgiving potluck and the boss roasts a turkey. It’s quite the treat. But every year, they were throwing away the carcass! Madness, I tell you. A turkey carcass can make a pot of soup that will feed you and your friends or family for days.

1 turkey carcass and any additional scraps or bones (skin removed)

3 bay leaves

2 tsp vinegar (any kind), to help pull the calcium and nutrients from the bones

2 Tbsp thyme

2 tsp oregano

2 Tbsp fresh rosemary leaves, minced

1 Tbsp sage

1 Tbsp celery flakes (if you’re not adding celery to the soup itself)

1 tsp salt

1 Tbsp black pepper

4 Tbsp garlic powder, or 1 to 2 bulbs garlic, minced (depending on how much you like garlic)

1/2 head cabbage*

4 carrots*

1/2 bunch asparagus*

2 bunches green onion*

2 onions*

3 red potatoes*

*Note: I always use celery (for flavor), onion (for flavor), parsley (for flavor), carrot (for color), and potato (for substance) if possible, but my soup vegetables tend to be whatever vegetables are in my fridge that needs to be eaten soon. It’s a great way to avoid wasting food. Listed above are the ingredients in my fridge that were already in the house and ready to get souped.

  • Put the turkey carcass in a large stock pot. Break it apart as much as possible.
  • Cover turkey with about 5″ more water than the top of the turkey (if you are simmering the turkey soup for less than 4 hours, cover turkey with only 1″, rather than 5″). Add bay leaves and vinegar.
  • Bring to a boil and reduce heat to a low simmer. Let simmer for 6-12 hours. I allow mine to go for 12 hours, adding water if necessary just to the top of the carcass.
  • Remove from heat and allow to cool for at least an hour.
  • Once warm/lukewarm, use a strainer/colander and another pot, pour contents through. Reserve meat and bones and put them into a bowl (or over a bowl).
  • To expedite the broth’s cooling process, I use a giant Ziplock bag full of ice and throw it in with the broth, and put the broth pot in the fridge.
  • When cooled, scoop the coagulated fat off the top and discard.
  • Once the meat has cooled, dig in! Sift out the turkey bones and discard any that aren’t easily crushed between your finger and thumb. Any crushable ones can go in with the meat. Remove bay leaves and discard.
Turkey soup bones and meat photo

Turkey soup bones and meat

  • Add meat back in with the broth, bring to a boil. Reduce to medium and add all chopped vegetables and remaining spices.
Turkey soup spices photo

Turkey soup spices

  • Saute and caramelize the onion the garlic, and add to the pot. To de-glaze the pan, I use some of the turkey soup broth and add it back in once the browning has come off into the liquid.
Turkey soup vegetables photo

Turkey soup vegetables

  • Cook for 10-20 minutes, depending on what vegetables you’ve added, and serve.
Pot of turkey soup cooking

Pot of turkey soup cooking

AMINE BREAKDOWN:
Very Low Amine: bay leaves, thyme, oregano, rosemary, sage, celery flakes / celery, salt, black pepper, garlic powder / garlic, cabbage, carrots, asparagus, green onion, onion
Low Amine: turkey, potato
Very High Amine: vinegar

Celery Root Fish Soup

Celery Root Fish Soup Photo

Celery Root Fish Soup

It’s fall, and time to celebrate soups! Celery root (celeriac) is in season in the fall, and if you haven’t used it yet, you really ought to give it a try. It’s an ingredient with substantial body, and a mellow, celery flavor. This low amine soup recipe is a sure crowd pleaser.

1 celery root (about 3 C, chopped)

1 lb white fish such as cod

6 C chicken broth

4 C water

1 bulb garlic, peeled and minced

1 1/2 C chopped Italian flat leaf parsley, packed

1 red onion, chopped

1 Tbsp sugar

1 Tbsp oregano

1 tsp salt

1 tsp black pepper

2 bay leaves

1 big pinch saffron

1 tsp ascorbic acid

3 Tbsp safflower oil

  • Peel celery root and slice into thin pieces about the size of a nickel.
  • In a large stock pot, add oil and saute chopped onions, garlic, and parsley. Cook for about 5 minutes, stirring frequently.
  • Add all other ingredients except fish. Simmer for 20 minutes.
  • Add fish, cut into a few large pieces. Simmer for 5 minutes.
  • Serve hot, garnished with finely minced parsley.
AMINE BREAKDOWN:
Very Low Amine: celery root, homemade chicken broth, water, garlic, Italian flat leaf parsley, red onion, oregano, salt, black pepper, saffron, ascorbic acid
Low Amine: sugar, safflower oil, white fish
Featured on Gluten Free Homemaker.