Quick Kimchee Daikon Radish Pickles

Quick Daikon Radish Kimchee Pickles (low-amine, gluten-free,soy-free, dairy-free, nut-free, paleo, low-fat, low-carb, vegetarian, vegan) photo

Quick Daikon Radish Kimchee Pickles (low-amine, gluten-free,soy-free, dairy-free, nut-free, paleo, low-fat, low-carb, vegetarian, vegan)

I love pickles. You all probably know that by now. Here’s another pickle recipe for you. This low-amine pickle is a quick salt pickle substitute for kimchee. You can do it with traditional Napa cabbage as well, but I prefer the crisp texture of the daikon radish kimchee pickle. Enjoy!

1 large daikon radish, peeled

1/2 tsp ascorbic acid

1/2 tsp cayenne

1/2 tsp onion powder

1 tsp garlic powder

1 green onion, sliced finely

3 Tbsp salt for pickling

  • Peel daikon radish.
Peeled Daikon Radish for Low-Amine Daikon Radish Kimchee Pickles (photo)

Peeled Daikon Radish for Low-Amine Daikon Radish Kimchee Pickles

  • Use a mandoline to slice your daikon radish thinly. The thinner you slice your daikon radish, the faster they will pickle as the water is pulled out of the daikon.
  • Put in a tupperware with a good seal. Add salt and rub it in to the pickle slices.
Sliced Daikon Radish for Low-Amine Kimchee Pickles (photo)

Sliced Daikon Radish for Low-Amine Kimchee Pickles

  • Close lid and refrigerate for at least 12 hours, shaking occasionally to mix salt and liquids around.
  • When the texture of the kimchee pickle slices becomes very pliable, pour into colander and drain. Run water over the top of the low-amine pickles and massage them in your hand, squeezing out all the water each time. Do so for at least two minutes, then taste pickle. If too salty, continue massaging pickles and squeezing out salted water until saltiness is at desired level.
Squeezing salted water out of Low-Amine Kimchee Pickles (photo)

Squeezing salted water out of Low-Amine Kimchee Pickles

  • Squeeze all water out and put the kimchee daikon pickles back in the tupperware. Add all other ingredients and mix together until all are evenly coated.
  • Serve as an accompaniment to your meal or with a side of rice.

AMINE BREAKDOWN:

Very Low Amine: daikon radish, ascorbic acid, onion powder, garlic powder, green onion, salt

Very High Amine: cayenne

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Fast Dill Pickle Substitute

Dill Pickle Substitute (low-amine, gluten-free, soy-free, nut-free, dairy-free, paleo, vegetarian, vegan, low-fat, low-carb, no preservatives) photo

Low-Amine Dill Pickle Substitute

Pickles… My greatest obsession. I love them so! But of course, with an amine allergy, they’re impossible to eat. Here’s a quick and easy low-amine dill pickle substitute recipe that will leave your taste buds satisfied and your pickle craving fulfilled.

1 English cucumber

1/4 tsp ascorbic acid

1/2 tsp dill

3 Tbsp salt

  • Wash cucumber and cut ends off.
  • Use a mandoline to slice cucumber very thinly – the thinner you slice them, the faster they’ll pickle.
  • Put all cucumber slices in a tupperware with a good seal. Cover in salt and rub salt into the cucumber slices.
  • Close tupperware and put in fridge for at least 12 hours, taking out to shake tupperware occasionally.
  • When cucumber slices have reached a flexible pickle consistency, drain into a colander.
  • Run water over low-amine pickle substitute and massage, to get salt out. Massage and massage, squeezing the water out firmly. After a few rinses, taste. When the salt content tastes right to you, squeeze all water out of the pickle substitutes and place in bowl.
  • Add ascorbic acid and dill. Mix well and taste. Add more ascorbic acid or dill as needed, but note that a little goes a long way!
  • Enjoy your dill pickle substitutes!

AMINE BREAKDOWN:

Very Low Amine: cucumber, ascorbic acid, salt, dill

Pickles, pickles, pickles, and all Low-Amine


Low-Amine "Soy Sauce" Carrot Pickles, Low-Amine Cucumber Pickles, and Low-Amine "Kimchee" Radish Pickles (photo)

Low-Amine "Soy Sauce" Carrot Pickles, Low-Amine Traditional Cucumber Pickles, and Low-Amine "Kimchee" Radish Pickles.

I made three kinds of low-amine pickles last week. All are made with low-amine ingredients (carrot, cucumber, and radish), and prepared in a low-amine method. The vegetables had to salt in the fridge overnight, but that’s about the most ageing these low-amine pickles did.

6 medium carrots

4 large pickling cucumbers (or one narrow English cucumber)

1 bunch radishes

1/4 C salt

1 1/2 tsp ascorbic acid

1 Tbsp soy sauce substitute

1 Tbsp sesame oil substitute

1 Tbsp sugar

1/4 tsp garlic powder

1/4 tsp onion powder

1/4 tsp cayenne powder

1 green onion, green parts only

  • Wash and cut all vegetables and keep separate. You can do yours however you’d like, but I sliced the cucumbers and radishes thinly, and julienned the carrots. Remember to keep them thin.
  • Salt liberally and rub salt into vegetables.
  • Let sit in salt overnight. Give them the occasional rubbing/mixing, and drain off excess liquids that have collected, if you can.
  • Rinse off vegetables very well. I rinse them at least three times each and give the vegetables a firm massage and squeezing out, to remove as much salt and water as possible. Continue repeating this until they are slightly salty, but not unpalatable.
  • Coat vegetables in about 1/2 tsp ascorbic acid each, or to taste. It should have a  “pickled” taste, but not be too tart.
  • Add sugar, soy sauce substitute and sesame oil substitute to the carrots and mix together very well, until sugar dissolves completely.
  • Slice one green stem of green onion into very thin rings and set aside.
  • Add garlic powder, onion powder, and cayenne to radishes. Mix well, and add green onion slices in. Toss together.
  • Present together on a dish, or separately. Chill until used. They will keep for a few days in the fridge.
Pickled carrots, pickled cucumbers, pickled radishes (photo).

Pickled carrots, pickled cucumbers, pickled radishes, all done low-amine.

AMINE BREAKDOWN:

Very Low Amine: carrot, cucumber, radish, salt, ascorbic acid, garlic powder, onion powder, green onion 

Low Amine: soy sauce substitute, sesame oil substitute, sugar

Very High Amine: cayenne powder

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Vietnamese Pickled Carrots & Daikon for Bun or Banh Mi

These Vietnamese pickled daikon radishes and carrots are almost indistinguishable in taste or texture from the “real deal” pickles. They are a delicious addition to Vietnamese dishes, and can be eaten as a snack, in sandwiches, in salads, or more. Use your imagination, and enjoy!

2 large carrots

4″ long piece of daikon radish, about 2-3″ in diameter

1/4 C salt

3 tsp ascorbic acid

1 tsp sugar

  • Wash carrots and daikon radish.
  • Cut daikon and carrots into pieces about 1.5″ – 2″ long, and use a mandoline to slice them into flat pieces.
  • Julienne daikon and radish, and in a large bowl, rub them down with the salt.
  • Leave on the counter for at least 2 hours (4-6 hours is ideal to give them a bendy pickle-like texture), then rinse well, three times (or more, if it still tastes too salty – taste to check saltiness). Squeeze water and out of the carrots and daikon “pickles.”
  • Once the salt content has been reduced, sprinkle with ascorbic acid and sugar, and rub well.
  • Allow to chill in the fridge before use for at least 30 minutes.

AMINE BREAKDOWN:

Very Low Amine: carrot, daikon, ascorbic acid, salt

Low Amine: sugar