Fast Dill Pickle Substitute

Dill Pickle Substitute (low-amine, gluten-free, soy-free, nut-free, dairy-free, paleo, vegetarian, vegan, low-fat, low-carb, no preservatives) photo

Low-Amine Dill Pickle Substitute

Pickles… My greatest obsession. I love them so! But of course, with an amine allergy, they’re impossible to eat. Here’s a quick and easy low-amine dill pickle substitute recipe that will leave your taste buds satisfied and your pickle craving fulfilled.

1 English cucumber

1/4 tsp ascorbic acid

1/2 tsp dill

3 Tbsp salt

  • Wash cucumber and cut ends off.
  • Use a mandoline to slice cucumber very thinly – the thinner you slice them, the faster they’ll pickle.
  • Put all cucumber slices in a tupperware with a good seal. Cover in salt and rub salt into the cucumber slices.
  • Close tupperware and put in fridge for at least 12 hours, taking out to shake tupperware occasionally.
  • When cucumber slices have reached a flexible pickle consistency, drain into a colander.
  • Run water over low-amine pickle substitute and massage, to get salt out. Massage and massage, squeezing the water out firmly. After a few rinses, taste. When the salt content tastes right to you, squeeze all water out of the pickle substitutes and place in bowl.
  • Add ascorbic acid and dill. Mix well and taste. Add more ascorbic acid or dill as needed, but note that a little goes a long way!
  • Enjoy your dill pickle substitutes!

AMINE BREAKDOWN:

Very Low Amine: cucumber, ascorbic acid, salt, dill

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Grilled Cod with Dill and Garlic

True Cod marinating in garlic, dill, and ascorbic acid (low-amine, gluten-free, soy-free, dairy-free, nut-free, paleo) photo

Low-amine True Cod marinating in garlic, dill, and ascorbic acid. The second cod fillet transformed into a salmon fillet for my lucky man, who is not amine-intolerant.

This simple entrée is fast and easy. Cod, when very fresh, makes a wonderful, light summertime entrée that’s low-amine and low-fat. You should count on one medium-sized fillet per hungry person.

2 true cod fillet

1 Tbsp fresh minced dill

2 Tbsp safflower oil

1/4 tsp ascorbic acid

1 Tbsp garlic, pressed

1/8 tsp salt

  • Mix all seasonings together with oil and rub on both sides of cod fillet. Marinate for at least 15 minutes.
My sweetie (aka The Grillmaster) displaying cuts of true cod (low-amine) and salmon (high-amine) marinating in garlic, dill, and ascorbic acid (low-amine, gluten-free, soy-free, dairy-free, nut-free, paleo) photo

My sweetie (aka The Grillmaster) displaying cuts of true cod (low-amine) and salmon (high-amine) marinating in garlic, dill, and ascorbic acid.

  • Grill on medium heat on a grilling rack (so that the fish does not fall through the grill) until desired doneness is reached. It should be about 3 minutes on one side, and one or two on the other, depending on thickness.
The Grillmaster going to town on grilling cod (low-amine, gluten-free, soy-free, dairy-free, nut-free, paleo) photo

The Grillmaster going to town on grilling cod (low-amine, gluten-free, soy-free, dairy-free, nut-free, paleo).

  • Serve hot.
Dill, Garlic, and "Lemon" flavored cod fillets. Delicious! (low-amine, gluten-free, soy-free, dairy-free, nut-free, paleo) photo

Dill, Garlic, and “Lemon” flavored cod fillets. Delicious! (low-amine, gluten-free, soy-free, dairy-free, nut-free, paleo)

AMINE BREAKDOWN:

Very Low Amine: dill, ascorbic acid, garlic, salt

Low Amine: true cod fillet, safflower oil

Tsatsiki / Tzatziki (low-amine, gluten-free, soy-free, dairy-free, nut-free, low-carb, low-fat, paleo, vegan, vegetarian)

Tsatsiki / Tzatziki Substitute Made with Cashews (photo)

Tsatsiki / Tzatziki made with Cashews (low-amine, gluten-free, soy-free, dairy-free, egg-free, tomato-free, paleo, low-carb, vegetarian, vegan).

Tsatsiki is a wonderful sauce to serve with many dishes. I like it with vegetables, or with lamb or chicken. Below are two variations on tzatziki recipes. You can use either mint or dill, depending on your preference in flavors, and vary the amount of cucumber you want to use, depending on your own personal preferences. One recipe is low-amine and dairy-free, and the other is vegan (nut-based).
Grated Cucumber for Tzatziki (photo)

Grated Cucumber for Tzatziki. It's better with larger shreds, but I don't have a less-fine grater.

YOGURT-BASED TSATSIKI (nut-free)
1 C plain yogurt
1/4 C English cucumber, grated
1 1/2 tsp mint or dill
1/4 tsp salt
4-6 medium cloves garlic, pressed
Ascorbic acid, to taste
  • Squeeze water out of cucumber.
  • Mix together all ingredients and let flavors mingle for a bit. Serve cold.
NUT-BASED TSATSIKI (dairy-free)
3/4 C raw cashews
1/2 C water
1/4 C English cucumber, grated
1 1/2 tsp mint or dill
1/4 tsp salt
4-6 medium cloves garlic, pressed
1 1/2 tsp ascorbic acid

  • Soak cashews in warm water. Let sit for at least two hours.
  • Drain cashews, and blend them in a food processor with garlic.
  • Add a little bit of water at a time, stopping to scrape down sides. Process until very smooth and all the water has been added (it should reach the consistency of a slightly thin yogurt – if it has reached this point without adding all the water, stop adding water).
  • Squeeze liquid out of cucumber.
  • Add cucumber, dill/mint, salt, and ascorbic acid. Mix well.
  • Chill in the fridge for at least a half hour.
AMINE BREAKDOWN:
Very Low Amine: cucumber, mint, dill, salt, garlic, ascorbic acid, water
Low Amine: yogurt, cashews

Garlic Dill Asparagus

A friend of mine is doing an “Around the World” food tour, taking on a 4.5 year commitment to cook foods from different countries and regions. It’s a beautiful idea, and she’s had great success with it so far. Sadly, there are few dishes that I can eat, due to my amine allergy. But my lovely friend found a country and dishes that were mostly low amine, and we were able to substitute out the things that weren’t amine allergy friendly.

Of the three dishes we picked, the simplest was, by far, my favorite. It was supposed to be green beans we used, but we went with asparagus instead.

Asparagus in a Garlic Dill Low Amine Vinaigrette.

Asparagus in a Garlic Dill Low Amine Vinaigrette.

1 large bundle asparagus

7 medium cloves garlic, pressed

2 Tbsp safflower oil

3 Tbsp blueberry or pomegranate juice

1 Tbsp vodka

1 1/4 tsp ascorbic acid

3/4 tsp loosely packed brown sugar

A few sprigs fresh dill

Pinch salt

4 Tbsp plain yogurt

  • Wash asparagus and snap off tough ends (it will naturally snap clean where it should. You can reserve these for making homemade vegetable stock.)
  • Boil water and add about 2 Tbsp salt to water. When water is boiling, add asparagus. Boil for about 5 minutes.
  • While asparagus is cooking, mix together everything but the yogurt and dill. Mix until all ascorbic acid is well dissolved.
  • Drain asparagus and cool down immediately under running ice cold water.
  • Once asparagus is fully chilled, drop into the marinade (in a flat bottomed tupperware, or Ziplock, etc.) and ensure they’re all well coated.
  • Marinate for 2 – 4 hours if possible. We were only able to marinate for about 30 minutes, and it still turned out good, but I think longer would be better.
  • Serve, sprinkled with finely chopped dill and a scoop of yogurt.

AMINE BREAKDOWN:

Very Low Amine: asparagus, garlic, dill, salt, pomegranate juice, ascorbic acid

Low Amine: yogurt, vodka, brown sugar, safflower oil

High Amine: blueberry juice (low in tyramines, high in histamines)

Original Recipe:

Sarımsaqla göy lobya – Green beans with garlic

400 g/1 lb green beans (runner beans or French beans)

25 g/1 oz garlic

2 tbsp vegetable oil

75 g/3 oz grape vinegar

a few sprigs of dill

salt

a few spoonfuls of plain yoghurt (optional)

Preparation: Cook the green beans in salted water for 6 to 10 minutes. Strain and set aside to cool. When chilled, add the crushed garlic, vinegar and vegetable and mix thoroughly. leave for 2 to 4 hours for the flavours to penetrate the beans. Sprinkle with finely chopped dill. Serve with plain yoghurt (optional).