Pea Shoots

Pea Shoots sauteed in Garlic, Ginger, and Onion (low-amine, gluten-free, soy-free, dairy-free, tomato-free, nut-free, paleo, vegan, vegetarian) photo.

Pea Shoots sautéed in Garlic, Ginger, and Onion (low-amine, gluten-free, soy-free, dairy-free, tomato-free, nut-free, vegan, vegetarian).

Pea shoots are a low-amine, colorful, tender, fun dish to add to any meal (who doesn’t like a vegetable with so many curly-Q’s in it?). It’s light, and comes together very well with the low-amine sauce used. It is simple to make, and can work as a low-amine entrée  or low-amine side dish.

1 bundle pea shoots (tight bundle should be about 4″ in diameter)

1 Tbsp safflower oil

1 Tbsp sesame oil substitute

2 Tbsp soy sauce substitute

2 tsp sugar

1 tsp corn starch

1 Tbsp ginger, grated

6 cloves garlic, chopped

2 Tbsp red onion, chopped finely

  • Mix sugar, sesame oil substitute, soy sauce substitute, corn starch, and ginger together. Stir until sugar and corn starch are dissolved. Set aside.
  • Heat 1 Tbsp safflower oil in wok on high temperature.
  • Add garlic and red onion. Cook until fragrant and onions are starting to go translucent.
  • Add pea shoots and toss rapidly so that the pea shoots cook quickly and evenly. When they start to soften, add sauce mix and continue tossing pea shoots.
  • When cooked to desired doneness, remove from heat and plate immediately.
  • Serve while hot.

AMINE BREAKDOWN:

Very Low Amine: pea shoots, corn starch, ginger, garlic, red onion

Low Amine: safflower oil, sesame oil substitutesoy sauce substitute, sugar

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Carrot Ginger Dressing (low-amine, gluten-free, soy-free, dairy-free)

Low-amine carrot ginger dressing (low-amine, gluten-free, soy-free, dairy-free) photo

Low-amine carrot ginger dressing (low-amine, gluten-free, soy-free, dairy-free)

This low-amine carrot ginger salad dressing has a nice zest to it and adds a lot of body and flavor to a salad without adding much fat. It’s a unique, flavorful combination that makes for a nice addition to many salads.

1/2 lb carrots (3 medium), roughly chopped

1/2 C fresh ginger, peeled & chopped

1/2 C shallots, peeled & chopped

2 Tbsp pomegranate juice

1/2 tsp sesame oil substitute

4 tsp soy sauce substitute

1/3 C water

1 tsp maple syrup

2 tsp ascorbic acid

1/2 C safflower oil

1/4 tsp salt

  • Pulse carrots in a food processor until almost pureed.
  • Add shallots and ginger, and continue processing until finely minced.
  • Add all other ingredients and blend until smooth (2-3 minutes).
  • If too thick, thin carrot ginger dressing with more water.
AMINE BREAKDOWN:
Very Low Amine: carrot, ginger, shallot, water, ascorbic acid, salt
Low Amine: pomegranate juice, maple syrup, soy sauce substitute, sesame oil substitute, safflower oil

Marinated Tofu Ties with Ginger Balsamic Sauce (low-amine, gluten-free, dairy-free, nut-free, fish-free, low-fat, low-carb)

Marinated Tofu Ties with Balsamic Ginger Sauce (photo)

Marinated Tofu Ties with Balsamic Ginger Sauce

This low-amine dish is so tasty, and presents beautifully. It even looks a bit like a present, with the green onion tied around it. It can be served as an appetizer, or a few per plate for a light entree. It is easier if you have the balsamic vinegar substitute and soy sauce substitute already made. Since the tofu has to marinate overnight, you have plenty of time to make the low-amine balsamic vinegar substitute.

Balsamic Vinegar Substitute

4 Tbsp blueberry juice, reduced over high heat to 2 Tbsp
1/2 tsp ascorbic acid
1/4 tsp molasses
1 tsp vodka
1/4 tsp lime juice

  • Reduce blueberry juice to 2 Tbsp.
  • Mix in all other ingredients.

Soy Sauce Substitute

3 tsp molasses

3/4 C blueberry juice, reduced over high heat to 1/2 C

1 tsp ascorbic acid

2 tsp vodka

1/2 tsp lime juice

1/2 teaspoon grated ginger

just shy of 1/4 tsp liquid smoke

1 pinch white pepper

1 1/2 tsp salt

1 small clove garlic, pressed

1 1/2 cups organic beef broth or chicken broth

  • Combine all ingredients in a medium saucepan over medium heat.
  • Bring to a boil and reduce to a simmer.
  • Simmer until reduced to a 2/3 to 1/2 cup of soy sauce substitute is left (about 20 minutes).
  • Keeps for up to a week in the fridge.
  • Shake before using.

Marinated Tofu Recipe

1 block soft tofu

2 Tbsp sugar

1/2 C soy sauce substitute

4 tsp garlic, minced

1 1/2 tsp ginger, grated + 1 tsp ginger, grated for garnish

1/4 tsp cayenne

1/2 lime, juiced

6 shiso leaves, rolled and chiffonade

8 green onions

1 large shallot

1/4 C safflower oil

Marinated Tofu Sauce Recipe

1 Tbsp balsamic vinegar substitute

1 tsp ginger, grated

1 tsp safflower oil

  • Cut tofu block into 8 pieces.
Cut tofu block into 8 pieces (photo)

Cut tofu block into 8 pieces

  • Lay into a deep pan that gives tofu just enough room between pieces to marinate fully.
Lay tofu in a pan to marinate. This pan was a bit small, to be honest. (photo)

Lay tofu in a pan to marinate. This pan was a bit small, to be honest.

  • In a small bowl, combine low-amine soy sauce substitute, sugar, garlic, lime, and 1  1/2 tsp grated ginger. Mix until well dissolved. Pour over the tofu and let marinate overnight.
  • Preheat oven to 275 degrees.
  • Lay tofu out on cookie sheet or aluminum foil (use one with walls or you may regret it). Sift garlic out of sauce (I use a tea strainer) and cover tofu pieces. Bake for two hours.
Marinated tofu with strained sauce bits on top (photo)

Marinated tofu with strained sauce bits on top, ready to bake

  • Meanwhile, boil water in a large pan. Cut tips off green onions and add them to the boiling water. When very pliable but still bright green, drain water and allow to cool.
  • In a small bowl, combine balsamic vinegar substitute, ginger, and safflower oil for the low-amine balsamic ginger sauce. Set aside.
  • Using a mandoline, slice your shallot thin. In a small saucepan, heat safflower oil and fry shallots until slightly browned and crisp. Do not overcook – once they start to brown, keep a close eye on them. Burning happens quickly. Allow to dry on a paper towel. Reserve oil for other recipes (I keep mine in small mason jars in the fridge).
Frying shallots (photo)

Frying shallots

  • Remove tofu from oven and allow to cool for handling.
  • Cut the long edges of the tofu off so that the white tofu is exposed. Leave the browned ends for contrast.
  • Squeegie the green onions between your fingers to get the juices and water out of it. You want them to be as flat as possible without damaging the green onion.
  • Lay the green onion underneath the tofu slice. Put a pinch of fried shallots on top. Tie the green onion in a knot. Add a pinch of grated ginger, and a pinch of the shiso chiffonade.
  • Plate with balsamic ginger sauce beneath the marinated tofu tie.
Marinated tofu tie with shallots, ginger, and shiso. Wrapped in green onion tie and served with a ginger balsamic vinegar substitute sauce. (photo)

Marinated tofu tie with shallots, ginger, and shiso. Wrapped in green onion tie and served with a ginger balsamic vinegar substitute sauce.

AMINE BREAKDOWN:

Very Low Amine: garlic, ginger, lime, shiso leaves, green onion, shallot,  

Low Amine: tofu, sugar, soy sauce substitute, safflower oil, balsamic vinegar substitute

Very High Amine: cayenne

1/4 C safflower oil

Featured in Gluten Free Homemaker.

Basic Stir Fry (soy-free, gluten-free, low-amine)

Simple stir-fry (low-amine, soy-free, gluten-free, vegan) photo

Simple stir-fry (low-amine, soy-free, gluten-free, vegan)

For a proper simple stir-fry, you’ll need a wok, high heat, and a good sauce. Stir-fry is one of the more easy things to make, and can be done with any number of ingredients, spices, and sauces. The key to a good low-amine stir-fry is knowing what order to throw your ingredients in the wok, and slicing things uniformly.

These ingredients go in the pan together at the same time. Use any combination of them:

Add First: Gobo (burdock) root, Sweet potato, Potato

Add Second: Onion, Garlic, Ginger, Shallots, Leek, Small pieces chicken

Add Third: Carrot, Brussels sprouts (small, halved), Firm tofu (if soy OK), cabbage, Zucchini, Beef

Add Fourth: Green onion, Celery, Bok choy, Pre-cooked corn, Green beans, Summer squash, Additional Spices / Sauces

Add Fifth: Bean sprouts, Bamboo shoots, Precooked Egg, Soft Tofu (if soy OK), Cilantro, Kelp noodles, Shirataki noodles, Pre-cooked rice noodles

 

  • Heat your pan to medium-high and add a couple tablespoons oil.
Burdock root (gobo root) just added to pan. I also add a little water to soften them because gobo root is so tough. This was covered and cooked for 5 minutes before any other ingredients were added to the low-amine stir-fry. (photo)

Burdock root (gobo root) just added to pan. I also add a little water to soften them because gobo root is so tough. This was covered and cooked for 5 minutes before any other ingredients were added to the low-amine stir-fry.

  • Add all ingredients in each “timed section” at a time, stirring/tossing ingredients in pan frequently. I wait till each added ingredient is about half-cooked before moving on to the next “batch” of ingredients. This timing gets closer and closer together as you move toward the end.
Burdock root (gobo root) and leek have been cooking, and carrot has just been added to the low-amine stir-fry. (photo)

Burdock root (gobo root) and leek have been cooking, and carrot has just been added to the low-amine stir-fry.

Notes:

  • If things are sticking, reduce heat to medium, add a tiny bit of water (1 or 2 Tbsp), and cover.
  • If your vegetables need more moisture to cook them throughout, add a little water and cover.
  • If your stir-fry is producing too much liquid, leave uncovered on a higher heat.
  • Make sure you keep the ingredients moving in the pan (especially on a high heat) so that they don’t burn.
  • Enjoy your low-amine stir-fry served with rice or on its own.

 

My low-amine stir-fry included: napa cabbage, gobo root (burdock root), leek, carrot, jalapeno, kelp noodles, and a sauce made up of 1/2 C soy sauce substitute, 2 tsp sugar, 1 tsp corn starch. (photo)

My low-amine stir-fry included: napa cabbage, gobo root (burdock root), leek, carrot, jalapeno, kelp noodles, and a sauce made up of 1/2 C soy sauce substitute, 2 tsp sugar, 1 tsp corn starch.

 

AMINE BREAKDOWN:

Amine content in food depends on ingredients used. Please see Low Amine Grocery List to find out about each ingredient used.

Chicken Drumsticks in a Pear, Sage, Ginger Marinade (low-amine, gluten-free, soy-free)

Baked chicken drumsticks marinated in sage, pear, and ginger. Served with garlic broiled Brussels sprouts, Quinoa salad, and Cilantro chutney. (photo)

Baked chicken drumsticks marinated in sage, pear, and ginger. Served with garlic broiled Brussels sprouts, Quinoa salad, and Cilantro chutney.

Chicken drumsticks always seem to come in the same flavors. Teriyaki. Sweet and Sour. Honey mustard. Barbecue. I thought I’d do something a little different, and pull it into the slightly fruity, savory flavors by using ginger, pear, and sage.

12 chicken drumsticks

2 tsp sage

4 Tbsp ginger, coarsely chopped

1 ripe pear

1 Tbsp safflower oil

1/4 C water

  • Preheat oven to 400 degrees, with the rack in the middle.
  • Pull skin off drumsticks. Discard skin.
  • Cut deep scores (4-6 on each side of each drumstick) into the fleshiest parts of both sides of the drumsticks to allow marinate to permeate throughout.
  • In a food processor, puree pear, ginger, oil, water, and sage.
  • In a large Ziplock bag, combine puree and chicken drumsticks. Get as much air out as possible and seal bag. Ensure all drumsticks are well coated and set aside to marinate for 20 – 40 minutes.
Chicken drumsticks in low-amine puree of pear, ginger, and sage (photo)

Chicken drumsticks in low-amine puree of pear, ginger, and sage

  • On a cookie sheet (preferably with a rack on it to allow fats to drip away), arrange chicken.
  • Bake for 20-30 minutes, or until juices run clear.

 AMINE BREAKDOWN:

Very Low Amine: water,  sage, pear, ginger

Low Amine: chicken, safflower oil

Cranberry Ginger Vodka Infusion

Cranberry Ginger Vodka Infusion photo

Cranberry Ginger Vodka Infusion

I’ve wanted to do infusions for a while, and this winter, I did. I tried the infusion with regular cranberry, cranberry with drops of vanilla extract, and cranberry ginger. By far, my favorite was the cranberry ginger vodka infusion, so I’m sharing it with you today! Enjoy!

1 C fresh cranberries

1/4 C peeled ginger slices

2 T Water

1/4 C sugar (do not use castor/powdered sugar)

3 C decent vodka (Sky or better)

  • In a medium pan over low to medium-low heat, warm up the cranberries, sugar, and water.
  • Stir until the sugar dissolves and the liquid turns to a light pink color. You don’t want the cranberries popping. Some will crack open, but do not explode your cranberries or it won’t make for a very pretty vodka cranberry infusion.
  • Pour the cranberry mixture into a large glass jar (or divvy up between smaller glass jars). I tripled the recipe and used two large bottles of vodka with 11 smaller mason jars (about 2 C each) and it was exactly the right amount.
  • Add slices of fresh ginger.
  • Top with vodka, seal well, and shake.
  • Let the mixture sit for about 3 weeks so that the flavor really comes out.
  • Add labels and ribbon to the jars.
  • Strain before serving.
AMINE BREAKDOWN:
Very Low Amine: cranberry, ginger
Low Amine: sugar, vodka

Low Amine Cilantro Chutney

I love cilantro. I love it so much that I could literally eat it by the handful. Which is, essentially, what I end up doing when I make low amine cilantro chutney. Except it’s by the spoonful. Nom.

Low Amine Cilantro Chutney

Low Amine Cilantro Chutney

1 large bundle cilantro, well washed

1″ piece of ginger, roughly chopped

1 Tbsp fresh green chilies (I like Serrano or Thai bird chilies)

1 tsp sugar

1 tsp ascorbic acid

3 Tbsp water

3 green onions

  • Put everything in a food processor and pulse until rough, then puree till mostly smooth.
  • Serve, or just pour the cilantro chutney into your mouth straight from the container. That’s what I do.
Low Amine Cilantro Chutney (photo)

Low Amine Cilantro Chutney, finished texture

Related Posts:
Low Amine Tandoori Turkey with Indian Spiced Gravy
Cajun Turkey
Cardamom Saffron Rice

AMINE BREAKDOWN:

Very Low Amine: cilantro, ginger, ascorbic acid, water, green onion

Low Amine: sugar

Very High Amine: green chilies

Baby Bok Choy with Garlic & Ginger

Baby bok choy

Baby Bok Choy with Garlic & Ginger

Bok Choy is a simple green with a lovely texture. Even when cooked through, it has a crispness to it that plays very well with other textures in a meal. I find that simplicity is good with bok choy, so I prefer to use distinct flavors.

30 baby bok choy, well washed

2 Tbsp safflower oil

2 Tbsp minced garlic

2 Tbsp minced ginger

1/4 tsp salt

1/2 tsp white pepper

1 tsp cornstarch

1/2 C stock / broth (homemade stock is best for a low amine diet)

2 Tbsp soy sauce substitute (optional)

2 Tbsp green onions, sliced thin

Crack of fresh black pepper on top

  • To help get rid of pesticides, I soak mine and give them a vigorous dunking in a big bowl of water with a couple teaspoons of ascorbic acid. Shake dry before cooking.
  • Heat oil in large pan to medium high. Wok is preferred.
  • Cook garlic and ginger until just fragrant.
  • Turn heat to high and add bok choy, salt, and pepper. Mix together well.
  • Stir fry for three minutes, or until bok choy starts to soften.
  • Dissolve cornstarch into the chosen stock.
  • Add stock and (optional) soy sauce substitute to pan and mix well.
  • Cook for 7-10 minutes, uncovered.
  • Sprinkle green onions over the top and serve (I forgot mine for the photo).

AMINE BREAKDOWN:

Very Low Amine: baby bok choy, garlic, ginger, salt, white pepper, cornstarch, green onions, black pepper

Low Amine: safflower oil, homemade stocksoy sauce substitute

Pear Fennel Ginger Soup

Pear fennel ginger soup

Low Amine Pear Fennel Ginger Soup

Pear Fennel Ginger Soup is slightly sweet, slightly fruity. I imagine it pairing well with chicken, fish, or lamb very well. The cardamom and sage bring it back down to earth and give it a warming, savory flavor. Don’t be so skeptical – it’s all low amine, and it’s all delicious.

Yield: 6-8 servings

4 ripe pears

2 medium fennel bulbs

3 C water

1/2 C cooked white beans

3 Tbsp ginger, minced +

1 Tbsp ginger, minced (reserved for the end)

3 packed tsp fresh sage +

1/2 tsp minced sage for garnish

2 Tbsp butter (or safflower oil, if vegan or dairy-free)

8 pods cardamom (tie them in cheesecloth or a tea bag so you can easily remove them later)

  • Add all ingredients to a stock pot, then cook for 30 minutes on medium heat.
  • Remove cardamom.
  • Add additional 1 Tbsp minced ginger.
  • Using an immersion blender (if you have one, otherwise a food processor or blender), puree until very smooth.
  • Serve garnished with a small sprinkle of minced sage.
  • Good served either hot or cold.
AMINE BREAKDOWN:
Very Low Amine: pear, fennel, ginger, water, sage, cardamom
Low Amine: butter or safflower oil

Nectarine Ginger Quinoa

zesty cod with nectarine ginger quinoa and apricot puree

Zesty cod with nectarine ginger quinoa and apricot puree

I went camping this last weekend and brought fish to cook and nectarines to eat. But I didn’t end up getting to either. The prospect of salmonella with my nectarines sounded a little less than appetizing, so I decided to cook them into a nectarine and rice dish. But quinoa was already in the fridge. I roll with the punches. Let’s do this. Nectarine Ginger Quinoa, why not? Glad I did – it was delicious!

2 unripe or barely ripe nectarines

2 C cooked quinoa, cold

4 Tbsp fresh minced ginger

1/2 tsp ascorbic acid

2 Tbsp safflower oil

1/2 tsp cayenne pepper (high in amines and spicy – alter for taste and amine tolerance)

Nectarines and ginger cooking

Nectarines and ginger cooking

  • Turn burner to low/medium and add oil and minced ginger.
  • Saute until fragrant, about two minutes.
  • Add nectarines and cayenne pepper and gently cook (you don’t want them to mash into nectarine slop) for about 5 minutes on medium low heat.
  • Add lime juice and quinoa.
  • Stir together and cook. I turn up the heat a little bit and let it blacken some bits of the nectarine and quinoa, but that is a personal preference. It isn’t necessary. Cook for 3-5 minutes, or until quinoa is hot all the way through.
  • Serve.
AMINE BREAKDOWN
Very Low Amine:  quinoa, ginger, ascorbic acid
Low Amine: safflower oil
Very High Amine: cayenne pepper, nectarine  (low in tyramine, high in histamine)