Onion Pizza Sauce (low-amine, gluten-free, soy-free, tomato-free, dairy-free, egg-free, nut-free, paleo)

An alternative to cream-based pizza sauce, tomato-based pizza sauce, or plain oil basted pizza crusts is this delicious, simple onion sauce. This lightly tangy onion pizza sauce is excellent with vegetables on pizza, and with chicken. I marinate the chicken for my pizza in a Biscayne Citrus Rub, ascorbic acid, a little water, and safflower oil. This citrus-flavored chicken is spectacular with the low-amine, tomato-free, dairy-free onion pizza sauce.
I use allergen-free Namaste pizza crust mix and cook it quite crisp, and do up a cheese-free pizza with vegetables and the pre-cooked marinated chicken. Examples of vegetables used are chopped endive, onion, asparagus, and thin slices of green bean. Whatever vegetables you should decide to use, just remember to ENJOY!

6 C sweet onion, diced

2 1/2 C red onion

15 cloves garlic, pureed with 1/4 C water

1 C loosely packed parsley leaves, minced

1 1/2 tsp salt

1 Tbsp cornstarch

2 C beef broth

1 – 2 tsp ascorbic acid, to taste

1/2 tsp Sichuan peppercorns, crushed

4 Tbsp butter (or butter substitute, or safflower oil. I use soy-free Earth Balance butter substitute)

  • Heat large saucepan to medium high. Add butter. Add onions.
  • Cook until onions start to sweat. Add garlic, parsley, and salt. Cook until onions are cooked through.
  • Mix cornstarch in with beef broth. Add beef broth, cornstarch, and ascorbic acid. Reduce heat to medium. Cook for 25 minutes or until the liquid is fairly thickened and evaporated out. Stir often.
  • Add Sichuan peppers about 5 minutes from the end.
  • Set aside and use onion pizza sauce on your regular or gluten-free pizza crust.
AMINE BREAKDOWN:
Very Low Amine: sweet onion, red onion, garlic, parsley, salt, cornstarch, ascorbic acid, Sichuan peppercorns
Low Amine: beef broth, butter / butter substitute / safflower oil
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Onion Pasta Sauce (low-amine, gluten-free, soy-free, tomato-free, nut-free, dairy-free, low-carb, low-fat, paleo, vegetarian, vegan)

Onion Pasta Sauce (low-amine, gluten-free, soy-free, tomato-free, nut-free, dairy-free, low-carb, low-fat, paleo, vegetarian, vegan) photo

Low-Amine Onion Sauce with Gluten-Free Quinoa Noodles

An alternative to cream- or tomato-based pasta sauces is a simple onion sauce. An added benefit to tomato-free onion sauces is that they’re great if you’re sick. Onions create heat in your body, and help you burn out the bad stuff. Since I’m still under the weather (going on two weeks now), I made myself a giant batch of this onion sauce with my gluten-free quinoa noodles.

6 C sweet onion, diced

2 1/2 C red onion

15 cloves garlic, pureed with 1/4 C water

1 C loosely packed parsley leaves, minced

1 1/2 tsp salt

1 Tbsp cornstarch

3 C beef broth

1 tsp ascorbic acid

1/2 tsp Sichuan peppercorns, crushed

4 Tbsp butter (or butter substitute. I use soy-free Earth Balance butter substitute)

  • Heat large saucepan to medium high. Add butter. Add onions.
  • Cook until onions start to sweat. Add garlic, parsley, and salt. Cook until onions are cooked through.
Low-Amine Onion Sauce for Pasta (low-amine, gluten-free, soy-free, tomato-free, nut-free, dairy-free, low-carb, low-fat, paleo, vegetarian, vegan) photo

Low-Amine Onion Sauce for Pasta

  • Mix cornstarch in with beef broth. Add beef broth, cornstarch, and ascorbic acid. Reduce heat to medium. Cook for 10 minutes, stirring often.
  • Add Sichuan peppers 5 minutes from the end.
  • Serve hot over preferred noodles.
Low-Amine Onion Sauce served over Quinoa Spaghetti Noodles (low-amine, gluten-free, soy-free, tomato-free, nut-free, dairy-free, low-carb, low-fat, paleo, vegetarian, vegan) photo

Low-Amine Onion Sauce served over Quinoa Spaghetti Noodles (low-amine, gluten-free, soy-free, tomato-free, nut-free, dairy-free, low-carb, low-fat, paleo, vegetarian, vegan)

Pumpkin Apple Dressing

Low-Amine Pumpkin Apple Salad and Meat Dressing / Sauce (photo)

Low-Amine Pumpkin Apple Dressing.

This slightly sweet dressing is slightly reminiscent of pumpkin pie and has a lightly tangy kick to it. It goes well on salads as well as being used as a sauce for meats such as chicken.

1/2 Fiji apple

1/2 C water

1/2 C organic pumpkin puree

dash clove powder

1/8 tsp cinnamon

1/8 tsp salt

2 tsp sugar

3/4 tsp ascorbic acid

1 tsp rubbed sage

2 Tbsp safflower oil

  • In a food processor, puree apple.
  • Add all other ingredients and puree until very smooth.
AMINE BREAKDOWN
Very Low Amine: apple, water, ascorbic acid, sage
Low Amine: sugar, safflower oil
High Amine: pumpkin, clove (high in histamines), cinnamon (high in histamines)

Tsatsiki / Tzatziki (low-amine, gluten-free, soy-free, dairy-free, nut-free, low-carb, low-fat, paleo, vegan, vegetarian)

Tsatsiki / Tzatziki Substitute Made with Cashews (photo)

Tsatsiki / Tzatziki made with Cashews (low-amine, gluten-free, soy-free, dairy-free, egg-free, tomato-free, paleo, low-carb, vegetarian, vegan).

Tsatsiki is a wonderful sauce to serve with many dishes. I like it with vegetables, or with lamb or chicken. Below are two variations on tzatziki recipes. You can use either mint or dill, depending on your preference in flavors, and vary the amount of cucumber you want to use, depending on your own personal preferences. One recipe is low-amine and dairy-free, and the other is vegan (nut-based).
Grated Cucumber for Tzatziki (photo)

Grated Cucumber for Tzatziki. It's better with larger shreds, but I don't have a less-fine grater.

YOGURT-BASED TSATSIKI (nut-free)
1 C plain yogurt
1/4 C English cucumber, grated
1 1/2 tsp mint or dill
1/4 tsp salt
4-6 medium cloves garlic, pressed
Ascorbic acid, to taste
  • Squeeze water out of cucumber.
  • Mix together all ingredients and let flavors mingle for a bit. Serve cold.
NUT-BASED TSATSIKI (dairy-free)
3/4 C raw cashews
1/2 C water
1/4 C English cucumber, grated
1 1/2 tsp mint or dill
1/4 tsp salt
4-6 medium cloves garlic, pressed
1 1/2 tsp ascorbic acid

  • Soak cashews in warm water. Let sit for at least two hours.
  • Drain cashews, and blend them in a food processor with garlic.
  • Add a little bit of water at a time, stopping to scrape down sides. Process until very smooth and all the water has been added (it should reach the consistency of a slightly thin yogurt – if it has reached this point without adding all the water, stop adding water).
  • Squeeze liquid out of cucumber.
  • Add cucumber, dill/mint, salt, and ascorbic acid. Mix well.
  • Chill in the fridge for at least a half hour.
AMINE BREAKDOWN:
Very Low Amine: cucumber, mint, dill, salt, garlic, ascorbic acid, water
Low Amine: yogurt, cashews

Carrot Ginger Dressing (low-amine, gluten-free, soy-free, dairy-free)

Low-amine carrot ginger dressing (low-amine, gluten-free, soy-free, dairy-free) photo

Low-amine carrot ginger dressing (low-amine, gluten-free, soy-free, dairy-free)

This low-amine carrot ginger salad dressing has a nice zest to it and adds a lot of body and flavor to a salad without adding much fat. It’s a unique, flavorful combination that makes for a nice addition to many salads.

1/2 lb carrots (3 medium), roughly chopped

1/2 C fresh ginger, peeled & chopped

1/2 C shallots, peeled & chopped

2 Tbsp pomegranate juice

1/2 tsp sesame oil substitute

4 tsp soy sauce substitute

1/3 C water

1 tsp maple syrup

2 tsp ascorbic acid

1/2 C safflower oil

1/4 tsp salt

  • Pulse carrots in a food processor until almost pureed.
  • Add shallots and ginger, and continue processing until finely minced.
  • Add all other ingredients and blend until smooth (2-3 minutes).
  • If too thick, thin carrot ginger dressing with more water.
AMINE BREAKDOWN:
Very Low Amine: carrot, ginger, shallot, water, ascorbic acid, salt
Low Amine: pomegranate juice, maple syrup, soy sauce substitute, sesame oil substitute, safflower oil

Tangy Cilantro Dressing and Marinade

I wanted to make Cajun Spiced Beef Skewers, so needed a sauce. I’ve adapted a recipe for a Tangy Cilantro Dressing & Marinade from The Daily Dietribe to be low-amine. I used the sauce drizzled over the top of the skewers once served, and saved the rest as a salad dressing.

1/2 C packed cilantro, stems and all
1/2 tsp sugar
1/3 C fresh lime juice (2 limes)
1/4 C apple juice
3/4 tsp ascorbic acid
4 large garlic cloves
1/2 tsp salt
1 C safflower oil
Cilantro Dressing & Marinade photo

Cilantro Dressing & Marinade

  • Blend cilantro, garlic, sugar, and lime juice in a food processor until well-processed.
  • Add all other ingredients and blend.
  • Serve with a dish, as a dressing, use as a low-amine marinade, or save in a bottle for later in the fridge.
AMINE BREAKDOWN:
Very Low Amine: cilantro, lime, ascorbic acid, apple juice, garlic, salt
Low Amine: sugar, safflower oil

I Love Spicy Everything

So I’ve been trying to figure out what to do… I love spicy food. I love hot sauces, Sriracha, cayenne, Habanero, spicy wing sauce, spicy pho, spicy Thai, spicy spicy spicy everything. If it’s not at least 5 stars, it’s not hot enough. But… eating it is dangerous.

Things I know:

  • Peppers are high in amines, and amines break my knees.
  • Hot peppers have Capsaicin, and capsaicin helps reduce inflammation, which is good for my knees (also, it is absolutely delicious and tastes like burning).
  • Dried peppers are even higher in amines because they’ve been dried.
  • Dried peppers that are then reconstituted and used in a hot sauce are even higher in amines than dried peppers.
  • Peppers used in a hot sauce that uses sugar and vinegar as main ingredients are veritable amine landmines!
  • I cannot survive without spicy food.
How to fix this? I will not be giving up my peppers any time soon. It’s just not happening. I will deal with the consequences if I must. But it would be nice to reduce my amine intake. However, fresh peppers don’t keep in the fridge terribly well, and dried peppers/chilies are higher in amines than fresh ones.
But frozen chilies keep perfectly fine (so long as you’re not worried about a crisp, fresh-pepper texture)!

When I go home tonight, I’m solving one of my problems. I’m going to the store. I’m going to pick up some Habanero, Thai chilies, and as many other hot peppers as I can (jalapeno just doesn’t cut it anymore – plus, I’m going for higher Scovilles and lower quantities of amines). I’m going to mince them and spread them out on a sheet of wax paper on a plate, and set them in the freezer. Once frozen, I will sort them into happy little spicy Ziplock bags, label them, and pull them out with every meal (Yes, every meal. I would probably put it on ice cream or cereal if you gave me the chance).

As a spicy food lover with an amine allergy, it’s not a perfect solution. But it’s a lot better than anything else I’ve come up with so far.

Do you have a more elegant solution? Spread the low-amine spicy flavors love and tell me about it!

Apricot Sauce

Talk about a simple sauce. If you have a few minutes and an immersion blender, you’ll be set to go.

3 apricots (or for low amine, use peaches)

1/2 C water

ascorbic acid to taste

  • Wash and remove pits, and chop into small pieces.
  • Cook apricots in water for five minutes or until soft.
  • Pour into high-walled bowl and use immersion blender to puree.
  • Serve over ice cream, desserts, or use with meat dishes, like my Zesty Cod dish.
AMINE BREAKDOWN
Very Low Amine: peach, water, ascorbic acid
High Amine: apricot

Cilantro Garlic Lime Sauce

This low amine sauce is delicious used as a salad dressing with or without the oil in the recipe, or as a sauce plated under a low amine white fish or chicken entrée.

2 bunches well-washed, chopped cilantro (about 2 cups)

8 cloves garlic

1″ fresh ginger, chopped

1/2 medium yellow onion, chopped

1 1/2 tsp ascorbic acid

1 tsp sugar

1/4 C safflower oil

  • Puree all ingredients until very smooth.
  • Adjust to taste.
  • Add water if it needs thinning.
  • Serve tossed in salad, plated under white fish or chicken dishes.

AMINE BREAKDOWN

Very Low Amine: cilantro, garlic, ginger, onion, ascorbic acid

Low Amine: safflower oil, sugar